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A poverty dinner by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 14-Jun-2011
Lets hear some of the cheapest make do dinner you had as a kid, I,ve had a mug of oxo with bread in it, shared a meat & potatoe pie, and often had a cup of milk with toast fingers dipped in it, do i enjoy or feel better on my modern day good meals? not really, there was something about those make do meals we enjoyed as kids.   
  • Re: A poverty dinner by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 14-Jun-2011
    hi i dont think im quite as old as some on here(sorry!!!!)but i always knew when my mum and dad were a bit skint because we had potato fritters,and i still love them and i made them for my children when i wasnt skint x

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 14-Jun-2011
    Hi Helen, I was going to say there's one good thing about them old days, you didn't have to spend time over a hot stove cooking, you didn't have the money half the time for the meter,let alone the food, but it's surprising how many of these young ones don't cook, they live on take aways, they must spend a fortune.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    Potato fritters ???? a make do meal Helen
    you must have been posh

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    Mary , I dont think the kids would know what an oxo is

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    cant beat a a good pan of potato hash, better the following day

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 15-Jun-2011
    Potatoes, peas and bacon - I love it still, especially withe bacon fat dripped over the potatoes.
    Porridge with ice cold "sterra" milk.
    Sugar "butties", the cheapest meal we ever ate.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 15-Jun-2011
    Morning ! I used to enjoy brown sauce butties.
    What happened to Adams best butter in the yellow striped wrapper.
    Lots of butter on the market now and my mam still says best butter even its another brand
    dont think you can get Adams best butter now

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 15-Jun-2011
    Bacon ribs and cabbage with butter all over it, although I might find that a little bland nowadays. Mum used to soak the salt out of them overnight.

    I used to love Sharples meat and potato pies. A treat for lunch with gravy or Oxo.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 15-Jun-2011
    Home made bread rolls and mum's Pea & ham soup. must just have a pinch of sugar in it. Mum would say "it'll stick ta ya ribs."...had it for a week at a time, cause there was nowt else. Still love it. But it never tastes the same as mum's.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 15-Jun-2011
    i wouldnt say we were posh lol,corned beef hash is one of my kids fave meal,even though they are 30,24 and 18,i used to love brown sauce butties julie,still do if i have to admit and beetroot butties x

  • Re: A poverty dinner by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 15-Jun-2011
    i just want to say that im so glad that i found this website,not only has it helped me with tracing members of my family but it cheers me up everyday reading the little anecdotes,keep it up everyone xxx

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 15-Jun-2011
    DITTO. Well done everyone.!!!

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 16-Jun-2011
    Last night we had Lentil soup made by my considerably better half it was lovely. This might have been regarded one time as a poverty meal but give me a simple dish like that anytime.
    There's a bit left for tonight if i want and you know it will taste even better when it's rested.
    Cheers Dave

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 16-Jun-2011
    All round to yours then !!!! What time you dishhen up, I'll bring my own bread...haha.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 16-Jun-2011
    i remember my mum boiling up the carcass of the sunday chicken with onion and carrots and making the tastiest chicken broth ever,still love it today with warm bread rolls and lashings of butter yum yum

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 16-Jun-2011
    Sounds better Helen than the sheepd head my mum used to boil, it was a lovely broth with barley, lentils etc, but oh the thought of it now, the things we enjoyed as youngsters, just turns my stomach, and it was nothing for us to enjoy my grans treat for us, a crust of bread thick with fatty dripping from her roast, and sprinkled with salt, did us no harm though, my sibblings are now aged between ... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 16-Jun-2011
    things mustve got much easier for my parents mary,im 48 and had a good diet really when i think about it,even though i didnt think so at the time

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 17-Jun-2011
    As a child living in Gorton, I did`nt realise it at the time of course, but we were very fortunate in the 40`s. My Grandfather worked in the large abbatoir at Mode Wheel.He would bring no end of goodies home,like tripe cowheel, pigs trotters chittlings (pigs gut) lambs fries,- delicious fried with the Sunday breakfast. Also rabbit,and other offel- stuff that people turn their noses up at these day... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-Jun-2011
    I don't know your age Roy, but I grew up in Gorton too, when I think of those foggy days, I always remember a work mate telling me of an instance where a young employee in town had led a group of girls home through the fog from town to Gorton, when they finished work and there was no buses running, she said she didn't know how they would have got home safely only for this girl, the following week,... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    When my Dad left Beyer Peacocks in 1966, he went to work as a riveter at Salford Docks at Old Trafford repairing ships - he was a member of the Boilermakers, Shipbuilders, Structural Workers and Blacksmiths Union.
    One of the perks was to "mooch around" during the night-shift all over the ships, looking for things to "borrow".
    He would often come home with very large tins of rock-hard barley-suga... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    Prince Philip visited Salford Docks and went to see the dockers. There was a commotion with a small circle of blokes standing round a man who was writhing in agony on the floor. Philip asked

    "What's wrong with him?"

    The shop steward host said "Oh, he needs to go to the toilet very... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Brilliant Peter, and oh so true.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by george gee (Member 10245909) on 8-Jul-2011
    my goodness gracious who were the lucky kids who had BUTTER when i was a kid my butties were spread with DRIPPING and when MUM had been to the C-O-O-P on her weekly visit we got MARGERINE AND JAM BUTTIES BUT WE WERE HAPPY GEORGE GEE

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 8-Jul-2011
    George, I think the answer is you never miss what you never had. We used to have that Echo margarine. Generally, we don't like to go back to what we had once we've had something better. Did you know that if you leave margarine at room temperature, even for months, nothing will happen to it. Flies won't touch it either.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 8-Jul-2011
    Peter, how did you find this out ?
    Guess where I am at the mo ?
    Golden Gate caravan Park North Wales, its throwing it down the sound of the rain on the caravan its just lovely

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 8-Jul-2011
    Say hello to Towyn and Rhyl for me.
    Our kid has just moved from Manchester along the coast at Prestatyn.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 8-Jul-2011
    I will do that John , My daughter lives in prestatyn thats why I bought the van so I can catch up with the kids during the school hols.
    Sadly Rhyl and Towyn is not like it used to be when we were all kids. I tell you though thousands still come here during the summer and its not cheap how a lot can afford it to be honest I dont know .
    Llandudno is still very appealing, at one time you only saw t... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 8-Jul-2011
    Hello Julie. If you ever go in Sandy Cove Club in Kinmel Bay - well at least that was what it was called back in the eighties - remember me to John, the owner. I used to have a shop in Kinmel Bay between 1981-84. I loved the place and had lots of customers from Golden Sands Holiday Camp which was close by, as well as local custom. Unfortunately ASDA almost put paid to us, as it did all the other s... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 8-Jul-2011
    Yes I think it is an Indian restaurant,
    The site you mention is still there I will pop in and see whats what and say hi for you.
    They are in the process of doing Rhyl up well the beach and the front that is.
    The small shops are going as there is now a precint but thats it really some of the shops are going to prestatyn is that a good thing I am not sure

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 9-Jul-2011
    Morning all,
    Our very first holidays were spent in Towyn.
    We would get ourselves to Exchange Station in Manchester by bus, and then a train to Abergele for Pensarn Railway Station.
    Then it was a mile or so walk along to Towyn and a fortnight's stay in a tiny, tiny caravan at Owen's Camp on the Abergele side of Towyn Church.
    The camp (this would be 1953 onwards) had no toilets, but a covered ce... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 9-Jul-2011
    John H, dont forget your bucket n spade!!! and your Wollie hand knit trolleys, skiddies, erh, swimming trunks. and bring back a stick of rock... have a nice time.BOYO.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 9-Jul-2011
    Thanks Julie. Just mention Jack & Ethel who used to have the shop across the road. Glad they are doing something about Rhyl at last. They have done the seafront at Cleveley's, and are just in the process of finishing Blackpool's and they are both wonderful. All they need to do now is get the hotels sorted out. I have seen what they have done at the north end in Blackpool and am really impressed wi... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 9-Jul-2011
    John C, thanks mate will do.
    Did you ever get a Revojet?
    They were like a kite but had two rotating "wings" that made a real racket when airborne, great fun.
    How's this for a lack of brains - I found an old rubber spade on the beach and because it was raining, Dad got us some paper to draw on in the caravan.
    Smarty pants here decided to use a sharp kitchen knife to cut the spade to made a rub... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 11-Jul-2011
    We love the Babbacombe area, and South Devon in general. We enjoy the model village, and there is an excellent chippy/restaurant called Hanburys.
    We are in North Devon at the moment - camping in a field with wireless internet. This is our favourite place, which we think is just a bit better than the very busy Torquay area. We are just outside Ilfracombe by a little village called Berrynarbor. Al... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jul-2011
    Peter, you lucky man, it sounds absolutely beautiful.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 12-Jul-2011
    Jack Forshaw
    Hi Jack , I went into the Kinmel Bay Social Club today to say hello on your behalf.
    The Manager John is not there anymore though he is believed to be alive and well the new manger has no idea where he is now.
    The current manager has been there years so your pal has moved on .
    I dont think it will be hard to track him down if you want me to ask around.
    The club did not look as wel... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-Jul-2011
    Julie, re margarine - read the following:

    What we have today is entirely different from the original oleomargarine invented by a French scientist in 1870. That was done quite naturally. Today, we get a highly unnatural process called hydrogenation in which liquid vegetable oil is converted into a solid or semi-solid grease.

    In the jargon of the chemicals industry, this process of turning a l... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 19-Jul-2011
    Scary sh** and we trust them to look after our well being! ! !Think I will adopt the Mediterranean way....just pour neat olive oil onto my bread from now on, Thanks Peter.Mind you the Lancashire way was just as good..Dripping on toast.mmmmmmmmmm.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-Jul-2011
    I only copied it from the internet, but have known for quite some time. You can't beat a bit of butter.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 19-Jul-2011
    Thanks Julie. Pity John has moved on, mind you thinking about it time really flies and he would probably have retired. Thanks for checking for me anyway. I'll tell you one thing you can do for me though next time you are in there if it's not too much trouble, ask if Terry Harper still goes in?

    I remember the floods in Kinmel Bay; mind you they had been warned for years what would happen one day... more >>

  • Re: A poverty dinner by julie (Member 10255407) on 19-Jul-2011
    No problem Jack I will of course have a toot , It will be next week now as I am at home .
    I take my comp with me while I am away so I can keep up with all the goss on here.
    Peter as for the margarine ( URGH ) not sure how I feel about it now think I will follow John

  • Re: A poverty dinner by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 22-Jul-2011
    Cheers Julie. I can remember walking across Fforyd Road to the club in 14inches of snow, with drifts up to two feet deep back in 1981-82. What a man will do for his pint. There was a great crowd in the club during those years. I loved it. The other thing which stands out during the three years we were there, is the wind never seemed to let up between September and April.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 26-Jul-2011
    what about Heinz Salad Cream butties???
    or even Heinz Sandwich Spread.???. mmmmmmmmm.

  • Re: A poverty dinner by harold wood (Member 10209840) on 13-Aug-2011
    Does anyone remember the soup kitchen on Hyde Rd it was near where the RBS is now i went in 1945.

Reply
 
MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 10-Jun-2011
We may have been happy, content and certainly proud of our childhood, and of the efforts our parents made to do the best they could, but what do you recall of circumstances that today would be regarded as poverty, or certainly hardships?
My initial thoughts, to kick this off would be:
The lack of fresh fruit to eat, except the apple and orange that appeared in my Christmas "stocking".
The lack ... more >>
  
  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 10-Jun-2011
    Don't forget the MOONLIGHT FLITS, I know all about them !!! came home from school and we had moved.... I knew it was on the cards but when??? All I got was if we are not here we are there...haha. thanks for that one JOHN, classic.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 10-Jun-2011
    And the way they talk these days about child poverty. Child neglect more like if you ask me. But putting up with the above wasn't so bad when we didn't know anything else. Going back to it would hurt more.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 10-Jun-2011
    Yes, certainly rough old days they were, but we were happy. We, like lots of other people who lived in Gorton and surrounding areas in those days, only ever saw chicken at Christmas. The rest of the year it was dripping on toast, sugar butties, nestles milk butties, jam butties etc. My very first birthday when I was ten we had jam butties and a few cakes my mam had made. They don't know they are b... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 10-Jun-2011
    Yes but when we did get anything a bit special in those days, didn't we appreciate it and enjoy it, these days Christmas isn't special, we have a Turkey dinner often, so that is no novelty, nor is most things, the only change in Christmas is for the worst, because these times it doesn't have the same sacred meaning. how about that big tin of fruit we had in the cupboard being saved for Christmas, ... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 10-Jun-2011
    Yes, you are so right Mary. Big business has certainly ruined Christmas today. I don't remember even thinking about Christmas until well into December, then, like you say, looking forward to those little treats that we dare not touch until the day. Now, well, Christmas starts around July and goes on and one and on, until by the time you get there you're sick and tired of the whole affair - and, of... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jun-2011
    Well done John C, Peter, Jack and Mary - you always come up with those little gems that jog the memory (moonlight flits - when do you hear that today?), sugar butties (my kids thought I was winding them up) and Christmas (Dandy or Beano Annual and chicken if you were VERY lucky) - brilliant memories.
    I have also remembered the following:
    Sharing clothes with my younger brother for school.
    Strin... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jun-2011
    Just one more thing about wearing wellington's in the Winter:
    Does anyone else remember getting a red-raw ring round your bare legs when the tops of your wellington's got wet and rubbed your skin?
    We called it getting "chaps" and the remedy was VASELINE rubbed round the red ring on your leg to stop the rubber chaffing your already sore skin.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jun-2011
    Last one from me this weekend - does anyone recall referring to someone with less-than-effective personal hygiene as being "chatty" - and I'm not referring to being talkative here!
    The expression came back to Manchester from troops in the trenches in France during the First World War.
    "Chats" were what they called trench fleas that got inside their uniforms because of the warmth from their skin,... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 11-Jun-2011
    Them bloody wellies,mmmmmm winter time worewith dads socks, summer time turned down to half size, so as not to get the chaff....
    Also when did you last see someone stoneing the front door step???? God help you if you trod on it.!!!

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 11-Jun-2011
    Yes, I remember those red rings around the legs from wearing wellingtons. Also going to school with shredded wheat box cut outs the same size as my shoes so I could shove them in my shoes to stop the wet from coming in through the holes in the bottom. Happy days. My mam's co-op divi number I have never forgotten - 32369. Amazing how some things stay locked away in your brain until someone gives yo... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 11-Jun-2011
    Yes but what about them clogs? I could even do the clog dance on the tips of them, but a true give away when you tried to sneak in Church late, and they clonked and echoed round the Church and everybody turned round as you tried your best to walk steady and quiet.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jun-2011
    Jack,
    Have just collapsed laughing about the margerine running down that lad's forehead, absolute classic mate.
    The shoe polish thing was what we did when wood was wet in the winter and the coal from the cellar was also damp, it was something I saw my Dad do, but I always thought it a big waste of Cherry Blossom polish myself.
    I bet your shovel had a charred handle like ours did, caused by plac... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jun-2011
    Sorry, that should read camphor NIGHT-lights.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 12-Jun-2011
    Hi everyone
    Have you ever listened to the Bradshaw tapes or cd's that you can get ? they have been going years and I have at least 10 tapes that I often listen to .
    The mam and dad and their son Billy, all the stories that are on here come to life on the Bradshaw tapes , even background noises are included.
    Can be a little blue at times with all the inuendo's, listen to them they are just bril... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 12-Jun-2011
    erm .... I meant to say sound effects, but the side effects are great also

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 12-Jun-2011
    hi everyone,this is going to be a long shot,but does anyone remember a family called bray who lived either on abbey hey lane or around there in the late fifties to sixties,the father was called harry and will be about 76 now.thanks for reading this and i hope to hear from you soon helen xxxxx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 12-Jun-2011
    H Helen
    Does this family have a daughter called Julie as I went to Levenshilme high school for girls and a girl in the year above me same year as my older sister she was called Julie Bray and lived in Abbey hey

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 12-Jun-2011
    hi julie,thanks for your reply,im not sure if julie was one of the daughters,how old would she be now?and if you have any info regarding any other members of the family i would be very grateful xx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 12-Jun-2011
    Yes, John, we did have a shovel just like yours - burned where the back of the handle used to catch fire. I remember the camphor lights and also having camphorated oil rubbed on my chest when I had a cold and bad cough; I think it worked too, despite what they say today about it having been dangerous and banning the sale of it. When you think about it the kids of today don't know they are born wak... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 13-Jun-2011
    Despite all of those hardships above, while in the R.C. schools we still HAD to bring in a few bob to adopt " a Black Baby " I think it was 5/sh. in pennies or even a 3pennie bit....can you remember that Mary? All mine were called Anthony....wonder if they ever existed or did it go over the bar in the local catholic club with the Priest???? WHAT A BLOODY CON that one was. haha.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 13-Jun-2011
    hi john,do you remember the bray family that lived on abbey hey lane in the 50s and 6os?,the father was harry,he will be around 76 now x

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 13-Jun-2011
    Sorry can't help you. My only memories of Abbeyhey ln. were when we was bunking off school to go up to the rezzers.!!

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Hi Helen
    I think julie if I have the name right,she will be about 54/55 ish my sister Karen whi is 55 said the name rings a bell but cant really say.
    That will make the parents in the age bracket that you are saying.
    Try the electoral role 192 people finder you get a few free ones but at least you can see if they are still around .
    I will have a look now for you

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Hi Helen
    I have had a look on electoral role , there is Harry Bray and a Kathleen Bray listed it does not give the address you can view the address but it will cost you .
    I have had a look in the bt online phone book
    and there is a Bray family still there on Abbeyhey lane might be related to who you are looking for .
    Also a Bray family Darrass Rd in Gorton
    and a Bray family some other part ... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 13-Jun-2011
    julie,thankyou so much,you have no idea how much you have helped and how much it means to me,if you have an email address i will mail you and explain why xxxxx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Helen I dont know if they are the people that you are looking for have you had a look for yourself in bt online phone book and 192 people search I am glad that you can at least have a go .
    This is a great site for searching for people but its also great just to read all the fab stories, Well done people keep them comming

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 13-Jun-2011
    Memories of poverty. My Mum sending my elder brother to the chip shop on a Wed evening with her last half crown, which he dropped down the grid. Then there was a scene where my Mum, brother and two neighbours were on all fours and had the grid up to try to recover the money. It was bread and jam that night.

    Wednesdays were often bread and jam. Mum would set the table with individual plates, kni... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 13-Jun-2011
    hi julie,thanks for the info,im sure they are the ones,contacting them is the next step which could be the difficult bit,i was adopted in 1962 and i think they are my half siblings xxx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Well good luck Helen , keep me posted
    juliejulie20@hotmail.com if you want to email me

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 13-Jun-2011
    thanks julie ill do that if you dont mind xx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    not at all by all means

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 13-Jun-2011
    For Helen LORD
    Helen,
    The 1901 Census Records show that a BRAY family lived at 429, Abbey Hey Lane, Gorton, Manchester:
    John Richard BRAY, born 1851 in Gorton, aged 50.
    Annie BRAY (wife), aged 46, born Huddersfield.
    May BRAY (daughter)... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 13-Jun-2011
    For Ms LORD (Part 2):
    The Harry BRAY you refer to, if 76 now, will have been born in 1935.
    The Birth Records at the National Archive, Kew, show one likely match:
    Harry BRAY was born in July/August/September 1935 in Gorton, Manchester.
    His Birth Certificate Reference is 8D/157.
    His mother's Maiden Name would have bee... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 13-Jun-2011
    For Helen LORD:
    Helen,
    The John Richard BRAY I referred to in the 1901 Census appears to have been married to Annie BRAY, born in Huddersfield:
    There are two marriages shown in the National Archive at Kew, which MAY refer to this marriage.
    Both marriages occurred in July/August/September 1895, both occurred in Huddersfield, when a John Richard BRAY married EITHER - Annie KEATON or Annie RENSHA... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Great info John well done , I am sure Helen will be pleased , Might consider asking you to find someone for me you are good at this sort of thing ... Julie

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 13-Jun-2011
    For Helen LORD:
    Helen,
    Just a word of caution:-
    Tread carefully when probing family histories, as sometimes people may be very sensitive.
    For instance, if you look at the age of John Richard BRAY when he married, it MAY have been his second marriage.
    Hope you don't mind me mentio... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 13-Jun-2011
    Hi John
    did you know of an Eric ogden ? may have asked you before
    I have heard that there was an ogden family in Gorton but it was two sisters no brother.
    The Eric Ogden I am looking for will be about 65/75 did live in the Gorton area in the 60's
    maybe on Stanley Grove but not sure
    I heard he was a bricklayer, the info I have may be incorrect but at least its s... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 13-Jun-2011
    hi john,thanks so much for all that amazing info,ive gone from knowing next to nothing,to knowing loads,i cant thank you and julie enough xxxx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-Jun-2011
    Yes I remember the adopt a black baby thing they had going, I forgot till you mentioned that, wasn't the picture of the child on some black and white shiney magazine paper? fancy you remembering the name of the baby,do you remember the St Joseph's penny? a card with squares round a Holy picture, and the squares had to be pricked for a penny a go, and the envelopes for the blind? the neighbours use... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-Jun-2011
    My dad used to give us a threepenny bit for our spends each week, (threepenny joey we called them then) I remember that coin above any, we felt dead rich us kids if we had one, I walked in the scolars with the Monastery, and Peacocks factory collected a pile for us from the workers and sent them into our school to be given to each kid, i walked home with a smile on my face that day, knowing i was ... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 13-Jun-2011
    All my adoptees were called Anthony, haha it yoused to piss the teachers and nuns off....whats your baby going to be called, not Anthony AGAIN!!! yes I would Say, because we had 2 or 3 james's in the class as well as some micheal's.. so I thought why not. owt to wind them bitches up.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 14-Jun-2011
    For Helenj LORD:
    Helen,
    I have managed to trace Richard John BRAY and his family back as far as 1851, when he was a one year-old child living at a place known as the Aspinal Smithy in the Village of Gorton.
    His Father was called John BRAY, shown to be a Lead Miner born in Cornwall, and his Mother was called Nanny BRAY.
    Last night I typed out all I have been able to find for you, too much to pl... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 14-Jun-2011
    For Julie:
    Hi Julie, you will need a little more detail I'm afraid, as Census Records run from 1841 to 1911,and you would need to pay to access the 1911 Census Records via Ancestry.co.uk
    If you have any details of names or addresses of OGDEN family members, particularly if they lived in 1901 and where, then you may have a chance.
    The place to start, I would suggest, is to trace current younger ... more >>

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 14-Jun-2011
    hi john,i have sent you an email to which you can forward the attachment,thanks helen xx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    Hi John , Thankyou so much for your message.
    Sadly I dont have any other info apart from what I have said , but I will keep on digging and get back to you if you dont mind as you have said I do need more to go off .
    Thanks again John , Julie

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 14-Jun-2011
    hi julie,how are you today?xxx

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 14-Jun-2011
    Julie,
    Thanks for getting back.
    Ideally you should try and get a name, age and address for a member of their family that would have been be alive in 1901.
    That way it's possible to back-track against Census Records to 1841.
    I know it's difficult, but that's the only positive way of doing it.
    Let me know how you get on.
    John.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 14-Jun-2011
    You didn't tell me John, did you ever get an Anthony in your family? By the way we didn't have a nun teaching us, but my sister did, and she said one of them could really be cruel with the kids, us girls all had our favourite priest to confess too though at confession, I WONDER IF THEY WERE FLATTERD AT THE ATTENTION?

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 14-Jun-2011
    Mary: The answer is no, Ive only one off spring and she has a good jewish name, Rebecca. and as a middle name of Senga. Its Scottish and also if spelled bacwards its Agnes, after my wife's gran.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 14-Jun-2011
    It's a lovely name "Rebecca" hope no one spoils it and calls her Beccy, come to think of it Anthony is a nice name too, and they spoil that and call them Tony,

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    My kids are Adam and Rachel, I like the biblical names Rebecca was going to be for my 2nd daughter If I had one and Luke or Matthew if I had a 2nd son but no I decided that 2 is enough

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by julie (Member 10255407) on 14-Jun-2011
    Thanks again John, I have no way of knowing any other details I am afraid, and to be honest not sure if Eric Ogden really excists it was just a name given to me to try and find .
    His name and age dont match up with any records so I have a feeling its a bit of a red herring situation, not to worry, will keep asking now and then, thanks Julie

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 15-Jun-2011
    Thanks Mary. When some of Rebecca's friends used to phone up...Is Beck's there? or is becky in. I would say in a stern voice NO BECKY or BECKS lives in this house and hang up. 2 mins later ...Hello Mr. Carlton can I speak to Rebecca please. Yes certainly..It may have taught them something.Well maybe not.haha lol.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 15-Jun-2011
    Did you ever see that old film John? called Rebecca, such a good film, and I liked the name ever since seeing it.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    For Helen LORD:
    Helen,
    Have you had any further luck with the BRAY family of Abbey Hey at all?
    John.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 20-Jun-2011
    hi john,i have found some that are now living in droylsden,ive tried contacting them but as to yet no reply,did you look up that death for me that i mentioned,or have you been far too busy replying to all the messages on here lol,its been very quiet without you x

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    FOR Helen LORD:
    Just back home, catching up, what was the death, please remind me?
    John.

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 20-Jun-2011
    hi john,it was christopher lord born 28/12/62,but registered jan 63,he died we think around april/may 1985,in lewes east sussex.he was born in blackburn,thanks

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by helen lord (Member 10262329) on 20-Jun-2011
    ive sent you an email john with some more details

  • Re: MEMORIES OF POVERTY by Mary Linnell-Simmons (Member 10286306) on 12-Jun-2013
    Mary Clarke - Did you know the St Joseph's Penny is still running and will celebrate 110 years of helping people next year? We are trying to recreate the old boxes and prick cards and need your help! Please ring Mary on 0161 817 2252 or email m.linnell-simmons@caritassalford.org.uk. For more information about the St Joseph's Penny today, visit: www.caritassalford.org.uk/appeals/st-josephs-penny

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schooooool reunion??? by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 9-Jun-2011
Well was it a success ??? or did everybody need gum sheilds and headgear.???   
  • Re: schooooool reunion??? by george gee (Member 10245909) on 9-Jun-2011
    the first one i av attended AND I THOUHGT IT WAS GREAT MY ONLY FAULT WAS I DID NOT SEE ANY OF MY OLD SCHOOL FRIENDS NEVER MIND MAYBE NEXT YEAR all tes BEST george gee

  • Re: schooooool reunion??? by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Does anyone know of any planned reunion for ex-St Marks', West Gorton pupils at all please?

  • Re: schooooool reunion??? by lee michelle roseweir nee tomlinson (Member 10251311) on 31-Dec-2011
    george gee u were a friend of my dads i think tommy/bert tomlinson

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Gregs Cotton Mill by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 1-Jun-2011
Did anyone work at Gregs cotton mill in Stockport in 1950 in the fancy doubling room ?   
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all sckoooools reunion. by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 1-Jun-2011
I have just been told there is a Reunion again this Sunday at The Nelson Hyde Road for all the Gorton Schools its in the afternoon i hope , If your not sure give them a ring to confirm   
  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 1-Jun-2011
    yes it is definatley in the afternoon

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by julie (Member 10255407) on 1-Jun-2011
    Hi
    The reunion's that take place do they happen regular I cant make this one but would like to in the future

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 2-Jun-2011
    not very often the last one was last june, problem is every time Alan Grafton arranges one im in Spain

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by julie (Member 10255407) on 2-Jun-2011
    So about once a year then , lucky you in Spain .
    I hope to attend a reunion at some point , I bet there really good

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 3-Jun-2011
    The answer is Yes There is a any age reunion for St Jimmys and Peacock street on Sunday at the Lord Nelson from 12 -3.00pm All are welcome I've been to the last 4 meeting and they were great Alan Grafton organises them but he has no computor so he leaves it to me to advertise on the net He try's to get them once a year but sometimes it fails so everyone please try to get to this one i... more >>

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 3-Jun-2011
    Like Barrie Roberts I went to St Jimmys from 1946-1956 and on Tuesday and Thursday (I think) we would go to Varna Street for wood work and metal work ( never forget the poker I made , really thought it was great ,but it wasnt )

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Irene ( Dunn ) Truman (Member 10023158) on 3-Jun-2011
    Alan, for all of those who cannot make it to the reunion... pictures please!
    Cheers.

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by george gee (Member 10245909) on 4-Jun-2011
    I went to st jimmies and also did my woodwork at varna st school before the war born in 1926 i went to beyer peacocks in 1940 as a turning apprentice i am going to try my hardest to get to the re-union tomorrow it just depends on the availlability of the busseslooking forward to the day hoping to meet some of my old schoolmates allthe best george gee born 15-7-26

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rent man. by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 31-May-2011
Oh no, the rent mans here, shshhh!!!! BANG, BANG on the door.
No discression here. at the top of his voice ...RENT. What a sad state of affairs back in the GOOD / BAD old days.!!!! haha.
  
  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Do you remember the "knocker up"? I wonder what happend when they got up late or were ill! did the whole area feel the pinch of loss of earnings? And the chimney sweep, we kids ran after him and touched him for luck, same when we saw a sailor in uniform, and if we seen an ambulance we touched our colour, to never follow, what a lot of things we kids believed in, and never wanting to walk under a l... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Hi Mary,
    Speaking of the chimney sweep, my grandad Jack (of all trades)Reid of Abbotsbury Street decided to help a friend sweep his living room chimney.He sheeted off the fireplace so that the soot would be contained and went onto the roof and dropped a brick down the blocked chimney. The only fault was that he put the brick down the wrong chimney. What a mess in the other room.It was a real "On... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    That was so funny Dave, by the way any relation to the Reids that went to the Monastery with me? Kathleen Mary John etc?

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Mary is my Mum and is well, Aunt Margaret is still living in Gorton,Aunt Jean is in Australia but my Aunt Kath and Uncle John have both passed away John was in his early fifties.
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Wasn't Kathleen the youngest? so sorry to hear about her dyeing Margaret was very friendly with me but wouldn't remember me, we were mates because we were the neatest writers in the class and always won the Holy pictures given, I don't remember Jean. But Mary although she was a little older than me, I remember well, because one day i walked behind her, and i heard a teacher remark how lovely Mary ... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Hi Mary
    My mother Mary was the oldest,we recently celebrated her 80th then in order it was Margaret, Kath, John and then Jean.
    My mum lives on Hattersley and is so active she puts us all to shame.
    Thank you for the lovely comment about my family
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Although we were RC both Kathleen and me sent our sons to St Marks school in West Gorton (They were both in the same class) I think the son's second name was Raye, Wish your family all the best from me, it was lovely hearing about them again, and your mum missed her way according to the teacher, she might have been well known and rich

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Yes you are right Kathleens sons Colin and Trevor both went to St Marks and Kath eventually was a chef on school dinners there. The only sibling that brought their children up in the catholic faith was Jean the youngest, her son is to be a priest when his training is complete.
    Cheers Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    That's the young lad I was trying to think of his name "Trevor" how is he these days? I worked with his dad at Slack & Cox I didn't know him, only by sight, and he was always on a motor bike, our foreman Graeme used to tell us he was his brother, but I think he was pulling our leg.

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 1-Jun-2011
    Trevor and colin are fine. Trevor lives with his wife and two children in Wales. His dad did a bit of TT racing in the Isle of Man many years ago.
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 2-Jun-2011
    we had a chinese rent collector called shin tin

  • Re: rent man. by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 7-Jun-2011
    Old Septic Knuckles.

    Ken Dodd: We used to live in Knotty Ash - just overlooking the rent.

  • Re: rent man. by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Our rent man had a permanent stooped walk and a crook back, spending so much of his time shouting through letter boxes!

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Coal fires by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 27-May-2011
Does anyone remember those misty rooms when the chimney needed sweeping ? talk about passive smoking our lungs must have taken some hammering
in those days, what with that and walking out in those dense fogs.
  
  • Re: Coal fires by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Living out here in the west of Ireland, we still have open fires.ahhh the smell of turf ( peat to you ) you cant beat it...If we have been away and driving back across country you can smell it,mmmmmmmm. On the Down side everybody smells of turf, great till you go back to G.B. then you wander why your stood alone in queue's. It just seems to impregnate your skin / clothes.I love it.

  • Re: Coal fires by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 27-May-2011
    Hey Paul that would suite you, I remember when you said you loved the smell of burning pine, is that a simualar smell John?

  • Re: Coal fires by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Not being asmoker, the smell to me is like an old man's pipe....Just have a large glass of Irish Whiskey and sit in front of the turf fire and you even TASTE the turf.mmmmmmmm.it just tickles the back of your throat!!!!nice.

  • Re: Coal fires by julie (Member 10255407) on 28-May-2011
    I agree John the smell of the turf.
    As soon as you get off the boat in Dublin you can smell the turf in the air.
    Spent many a time down the bog getting it.
    long dirty days but great fun then having to store you turf for the Range or open fire .
    The smell is magic.

  • Re: Coal fires by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 9-Jun-2011
    Does anyone recall coal fired chipshops before the introduction of gas fired friers. There was always a bucket of coal and a small shovel handy behind the counter.

  • Re: Coal fires by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Can you all remember that with a coal fire in every home, the only thing that was placed in your dustbin were ashes from the fire and burned tins, because everything else got put in the fire.
    Here's a good one for the memory:
    Do you remember your gran calling the dustbin the "midden" and nothing else?
    Dustbin-men were always called the "midden-men" in our house.
    That's a real throw-back hundre... more >>

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Shops on Gortoncross Street by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 27-May-2011
Just to start a list off, as I recall from the 60's and 70's:
Jerinas - butchers
Shores - fruit & veg
Wheelers - records & cycles
Coynes - gents outfitters (and on Wellington St)
B & L Value - fancy goods and gent... more >>
  
  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Nice One...I happily remember going into Halons and coynes, for my ben sherman shirts, evapress trousers, and crombie...even them little black bomber jackets with tartan linning...Also had a school mate Called MALCOLM ALLCOCK who worked in Jerinas ( was that the right name? )grey moment.?? also didn't Coynes have a pawn brokers on wellington st. seem to remember something around that shop.???

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Maybe the shop was Coens??? down near Hyde rd, end, was it next to the cosmo?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by julie (Member 10255407) on 28-May-2011
    Was those jackets called the Harrington ?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 29-May-2011
    Was there a gent's outfitters on Gortoncross Street called "Weaver to Wearer?"

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 29-May-2011
    Was`nt there a Burgons grocers shop on Cross St.?. My cousin worked for them till she was transfered to the one on Stockport Rd. Levenshulme. Also at the top of Cross St, on the junction with Wellington St, there was a large furniture store called Brooks` Just over this junction, going towards Abbey Hey, there was a little corner shop called Linneys`. I recall going in there with my Gran,and there... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by steven massey (Member 10154327) on 4-Jun-2011
    if you go to this site it has a list of the traders and map of cross street as well as other gorton memories

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Does anyone remember a landlord of the Suburban in the late 70's who had the first name of Matt?
    I met him several times away from Gortoncross Street, but can't remember his surname, any help at all?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by joyce sutton (Member 10260496) on 22-Jun-2011
    Hi does anyone remember the sweet shop on Hyde Road called EGERTONS next to the side door of the Cosmo near the Plough

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by PARTYPETE (Member 10092520) on 24-Jun-2011
    I worked in the Wood shop in 1966, also remember the L.H.D groceries, the Herbalist, Chip shop, Toy shop, Cafe, Dry cleaners, Shaw's Green Grocers, John Whites shoe shop, Paper shop (worked there as well) Off License facing the rose of England pub, Bakery near the Bank,, Prices bakery and Phil Greens that sold everything including Paraffin, until the shop burnt down :(

    I have fond memories of C... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Robert (Bob) Moore (Member 10099906) on 26-Dec-2011
    I remember the hotel on Gortoncross St, I seem to remember it was called The Suburban, and Gortoncross St was just called Cross St in the 40's and early 50's. My mam used to work as a barmaid at the Midlands Hotel on Hyde Road, and sold tickets in the Ticket Box at Belle Vue, and I worked in the car park at Belle Vue at Easter time, you wore a yellow coat, and it used to attract the sun, and you h... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Graham Corbett (Member 10271490) on 9-Mar-2012
    Hi Im new to the site, which incidently I find extremely good and interesting. I was born in a house at 3 Mount Road in Oct 1957. I grew up in Gorton through the sixties and seventies, living at various adresses there after,ie Hexham Road, Bridstowe Walk (Hattersly, Highmead Street. I have very fond memories of Gorton Cross Street. My Dad used to run a Butchers at the top end, next to a pup (I th... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Karen (Member 10279443) on 31-Oct-2012
    Does anyone remember Barrys cafe on cross Street in the early 70s?

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West Gorton Savoy by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 26-May-2011
Does anyone remember the Savoy in Renshaw Street,
it was a shabby little cinema, but the kids loved the saturday serials, half the seats were missing, and in the dark you used to think one was there and end up falling into somebody's lap,but the price was a bit cheaper than the more select Corona, so sometimes it was only what us kids could afford
  
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Teasing kids by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 22-May-2011
Do you ever tease your grand kids? My great grandchild got carried away with the Royal wedding, and wanted to meet a Prince like kate did, so she could be a princess, she is only eight and asked me was Ptince harry eight like her, I kidded her along tha he was William's little brother, and she thought she was in with a chance of becoming a princess, she couldn't wait to see the royal wedding and p... more >>   
  • Re: Teasing kids by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    My Dad used to give us pocket-money, and tell us that the gas meter was a money-box!

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School days by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 22-May-2011
Were school days the happiest days of your life? they were good and brought plenty of friends, but I was happy to leave I think. The teachers could be a pain at times and some of the kids.   
  • Re: School days by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 23-May-2011
    I don't think I ever enjoyed going to school Mary, as I would imagine neither did the majority of us if we tell the truth. There were times when I enjoyed it but mostly I have to say that I didn't and was glad when I left. I think if most of us had had a choice of whether to go to school or not, I think the "or nots" would be in a big majority. Spurley Hey was a good school though and most of the ... more >>

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 23-May-2011
    when attending catholic schools in Scotland before comming to Gorton. I was Victimised by our class teacher every Monday morning...She would always ask me " What colour were the preist's vestments yesterday " " don't know "... I would reply as I never went to church. out here 6 lashes of the belt, and I would then say " that make you feel better " I would then receive another 2, for my cheek....s... more >>

  • Re: School days by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 24-May-2011
    That is a bad example you give there, John. I once got the strap for smoking in the school toilets, that didn't stop me smoking either, but it certainly made me more aware of not being caught again. If corporal punishment doesn't work, how come classes, even with more than forty pupils, were kept in order by the teachers, most of the time with not a word uttered. If someone did misbehave the teac... more >>

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 24-May-2011
    Well said, the teacher involved with me had a run in with my older sister a few years before....in which my mother went down to the school, and sorted the teacher out ( good style )so when I arrived at the same school it only took a few weeks before the teacher asked " did you have a sister that attended this school " cards marked from then on for me......would not happen now....and if I complaine... more >>

  • Re: School days by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 24-May-2011
    WE ALSO WAS ASKED THE COLOUR OF THE PRIEST'S VESTMENTS, AS THEY MARKED THE MASS REGISTER ON A MONDAY MORNING, AT ST FRANCIS SCHOOL GORTON,(THIS WAS THE PROOF THAT WE WERE TELLING THE TRUTH THAT WE HAD BEEN TO MASS)WE USED TO ASK A COUPLE OF OUR MATES THE COLOUR IF WE HAD NOT ATTENDED, AND THE STRAP WAS ALSO GIVEN TO US FOR MISSING MASS THINK THE STRAP WAS USED TOO OFTEN IN THEM DAYS IF WE WERE LAT... more >>

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 24-May-2011
    John,
    It's difficult for an old proddy-dog to understand just how badly some RC boys and girls must have been treated about non-attendance at church - you have my sympathy mate, and thank goodness, I hope times have changed.
    I lived in a very mixed religion area in West Gorton, and the only time I noticed the difference was when our best goalie had to attend Mass, and we always lost those games.

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 24-May-2011
    Hi John, thanks...When we moved from Scotland to Gorton I was adamant that I was not going to another Catholic school, so I ended up at the NEW SCHOOL on Taylor st. later to be Bishop Greer. what a difference that made to me I loved it, even stayed on an extra year GREAT TIMES.many thanks again.

  • Re: School days by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 9-Jun-2011
    I visited Gorton recently,and as I drove along Mount Rd., I was amazed to see that my old School,- Spurley Hey, has been demolished. The newer part which was built on most of the playing fields is still there, but the original red brick building is no more. So sad, and my heart sank at the sight of it. More damn progress I suppose.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    When I was a young fresh-faced nineteen year old Police Officer working in Gorton in the late 60's and early 70's, one of the best jobs on the day-shift was seeing school-kids across Mount Road - morning, dinner-times and in the afternoon.
    I kid you not, they were SO polite.
    These days there's a risk that they would pull a gun on you!
    How times have changed.

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    Hi John

    Did you work with Stan Egerton, as I think his first beat was Gorton? He was the DI who arrested Shipman, and I knew him through fund-raising events associated with the Scouts on Far Lane. I think Peter Topping also walked the streets of Gorton and knew Ian Brady at the time.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Peter,
    When I wasan experienced Detective working the Gorton area out of Mill Street Police Station, Stan Egerton came into the office as an Aide (a Uniformed PC who was there for six months in order to "learn the ropes" and hopefully graduate to full Detective status after training.
    I am proud to say that the lovely Stan was my Aide and I taught him all I knew and, yes, he was the first to susp... more >>

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    John, I was devastated to hear of his death in 2001. I would strongly suspect the strain of that last case contributed to his illness. It was a true horror story, and initially he had members of the public berating him in the street because he was "picking on" their favourite doctor. His contributions to society/charity are too great to list here, and I believe his funeral was attended by many peo... more >>

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    Just to clarify. Stan Egerton (BEM) wasn't an actual friend of mine. I knew him through a fund-raising old-boys association at the Scouts. I was in awe at what he'd done for others.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Peter,
    That would be typically Stan's reaction, he was a very kind, thoughtful, generous and straight-forward man in a world that sometimes was not as good as he.
    His charity work was totally unknown at one time, but it came as no surprise to me.
    In the six months I trained him, we had a wonderful time, he had a great sense of humour and was a real asset to the Police Service.
    Like you said Pe... more >>

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Exchanges by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
Has anyone ever exchanged items as a kid, and regretted it afterwards, I won a lovley pair of Rosary beads at school in a raffle, I exchanged them for a doll, and got a good telling off from my mum, the girl had a temprory phase that she wanted to be a catholic, and dropped the idea later when she had lost my rosary, and i haven't seen any as nice since as they were unusual colour and small size. (mum's know best)   
  • Re: Exchanges by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    I almost managed to swap my younger brother for a track-bike (no brakes and cow-horn handle-bars included)but the deal was called off when he managed to unlock the crate from the inside.
    I later built my own bike!

  • Re: Exchanges by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 17-May-2011
    Brothers, eh?!

  • Re: Exchanges by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Hi Margaret,
    It's funny, but Christopher and I grew closer after that, and I sold him the bike.
    You OK Margaret?
    Will give your regards to our kid this weekend,
    John.x.

  • Re: Exchanges by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 17-May-2011
    Hi John, I am fine thanks. Will e mail tomorrow. So glad Christopher forgave you.

  • Re: Exchanges by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 21-May-2011
    does anyone remember those bubblegum machines which gave you a bubblegum and a little toy? Once I got a small plastic Bible on the way to school and I gave it to my friend, being much brighter than I, she discovered that their was a viewfinder at the bottom and when you looked through it it had The Lord's prayer, I couldn't believe I had given it away so I promptly took it back (after a little pla... more >>

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St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 16-May-2011
Does anyone remember Mrs Clayton of St Marks school? she was the head teacher when my sons went to school, she could put the parents in order I don't know about the kids, my mother in law could stick up for herself, but i knew one instance she was gob smacked and stood with her mouth open, when Mrs clayton went over to her and a group of friends who were talking too noisely in the play ground, whi... more >>   
  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    At Gorton Mount, there was a new teacher called Mr Blackburn, who was an excellent teacher. He sorted out troublesome kids with no messing, and initially had parents queuing up to 'sort him out'. He persevered with his methods and became a highly-respected teacher who would have kids eating out of his hand. He knew how to capture a child's imagination and make everything interesting. He would cond... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    Yes the Teachers could keep the kids in order in them days, we were afraid to do wrong, it is alright the kids these days being matey with the teachers, but it gets too familier and the kids take advantage.

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    You're right Mary. Myself, I would have liked to have been treated less formally by teachers, but I agree a lot of kids would have taken too many liberties. I didn't even know I'd got a first name till I left school. ;-)

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 17-May-2011
    I REMEMBER MR BLACKBURN , HE WAS DEPUTY HEAD AT GORTON MOUNT THEN HE GOT THE HEAD TEACHERS JOB AT OLD HALL DRIVE, I WAS,NT IN HIS CLASS , I WAS IN MR BROWNS IN 4TH YEAR I USE TO LOVE THAT SCHOOL , I WAS ON THE SWIMMING TEAM FOOTBALL TEAM AND CRICKET TEAM FOR MY LAST TWO YEARS , IVE JUST THOUGHT OF A COUPLE OF TEACHERS ,MR KEAN MRS WATERS MR JUDGE I THINK MR REYNER ANR MISS RUMNEY ,

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I didn't know I was one person Peter, my sister and me were always known as the Clarke twins

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    Such is life Mary. Danny, I remember Mr Raynor and Mrs Lester, and Mr Keen. All great teachers, and Miss Smedley.

    I think you know two of my friends - Mike and Sue Ludwigsen. I do remember you vaguely from Gorton Mount. Pete

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    Was Gorton Mount the feeder school from Old Hall Drive? I remember Old Hall Drive being my first school I couldn't go to The Sacred heart until I was 5 and i had my gas mask fitted at Old hall drive when war broke out, cor I'm an old biddie, I remember that day as if it was yesterday..Why?
    because I was looking into the frying pan as mum fried bacon, and fat splashed in my eye, I tried my gas ma... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Mrs CLAYTON, and her Deputy Head, Vincent PLATT were the worse kind of teachers, a couple of inverted snobs who looked down their noses at the raggedy-arsed kids in their care.
    The bullied everyone, staff, pupils and in her case her husband - read other pages in here for dreadful stories of her approach to teaching.
    PLATT was a fool, and a weak-willed fool at that, too frightened of his career t... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    You couldn't have described these two teachers better John, this was just as i remember them,and when you went into her office, it reaked in cigarette smoke, it choked you, that women could certainly smoke, Anne Robinsons manner always reminds me of her,

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Mary, spot on, Ann Robinson - perfect fit for old lemon lips, I never saw them smile once in seven years.

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 17-May-2011
    ( Tough Teachers )
    Age just 11 yrs I went to Levenshulme High for girls.
    On the first day we were all told that we would earn merits for good behaviour and for good effort with our work.
    We was warned that we could also lose our merits and get de-merits, if we got 3 of these then we would automatically get a detention.
    I was really afraid at the thought of de-merits and the detention thing, n... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 17-May-2011
    on a nicer note !
    Good old Mr Raynor ( Gorton Mount )
    He taught us caligraphy, and if our team got so many gold stars we would all get a brand new pencil, very exciting,
    He used to smoke a pipe and we saw him smoke it to in the classroom , he used to give us girls his tobacco tins to play hop scotch.

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Julie. Mr Raynor was one of the best. A very nice man, and when he read a story he could capture your attention better than any tv programme. I've said before but young girls adored him, and they would hang onto his arms walking down Mount Road every morning and night for almost generations of pupils. Those who couldn't get a place on his arms would swarm round him. It really pains me to think ... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 18-May-2011
    HI PETER,OF COURSE YOU KNOW ME. I KNOW YOU , I KNOW THAT YOU LIVED ONTRUST RD NEXT TO THE COOPERS AND I ALSO KNOW THAT YOU HAVE A BROTHER CALLED DAVID

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Danny. Yes, I do know you, but it's so long ago, I only remember you vaguely. You may have had more contact with our Dave as you went to Spurley Hey. Pete

  • Re: St Marks by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 18-May-2011
    I remember a teacher at Gorton Mount in the 50's who was just the same as Mr Raynor in that he also always had the girls on his arms walking around the playground, with swarms of other girls following around him. His name was Mr Critchley, a very handsome man indeed who always reminded me of the film star, "Cornel Wilde". Wonderful man and wonderful days, but like you say Peter, today they would p... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 18-May-2011
    Oh he was a lovely person thats true, he was also firm as a teacher always had good control over the class not that there was really ant uncontrolable classes back then.
    We used to hang around after him because of his tobacco tins we thought that by hanging onto his arms that we would get the tin lol.
    Awww the poor man must have been in agony but what a wonderful teacher

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 18-May-2011
    Do you remember the creative dancing we used to do in PE it was filmed many times I wonder what has happened to the films that were made

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    The Police have got them Julie. lol

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 19-May-2011
    There was a wonderful teacher at St Marks' in the 1950's.
    She was Mrs BUTTERWORTH who loved children and taught me to read and write, and I saw her years later when she was a very old and frail lady, but still had a wonderful charm and twinkle in her eye.
    I owe her everything, what a lovely lovely lady she was.

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 19-May-2011
    HI PETE I DID,NT GO TO SPURLEY I WENT TO BURNAGE A MUCH POSHER SCHOOL. AH

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    That was posh Danny. I applied and they gave me Central.

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 19-May-2011
    Burnage High for boys then Danny
    Often the boys at lunch time would hang around Levenshulme high for girls as it was not far from the upper school (Errwood Rd).
    Our tennis courts was seen from the main Road and we often saw the boys hanging around.
    There was a park opposite or a bowling green, some of us used to bunk off the odd lesson and meet up with some boys.
    My mother at the time was a n... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 19-May-2011
    The three schools my mother picked for us was in order Levenshulme,Central for girls,and Parrswood as I have said Karen,myself and Angela
    all went to Levenshulme.
    Levenshulme used to be a grammer school but went comprehensive the year Our Karen went and I went the year after and Angela the year after that.
    The teachers used to wear the cap and gown but that changed after a short while.
    Gordon... more >>

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Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 16-May-2011
Does anyone know any of the families off the prison ground 1939 -55 that was the time I lived there in Forbes Street, it would be nice to know how the old neighbours are getting on.   
  • Re: Prison ground by Kate Nowell (Member 10137684) on 17-May-2011
    I knew Mr and Mrs Newton and their three children, Donald, Marion and Geoffrey. Opposite lived the Hennevers who I think had a son and a daughter. Mr Hennever worked as a postman. We always had our bonfires in the big back yards there. Treacle toffee, potatoes roasted in the fire. Does anybody remember the wash-houses there?

  • Re: Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I remember The Henevors but I thought they lived in the warden houses (On Hyde Road) or was that later? Joe the son was in the Coldstream Guards like my husband, that is how I remember them, yes the dad was a postman.

  • Re: Prison ground by Kate Nowell (Member 10137684) on 17-May-2011
    Yes, you're right Mary, the houses were on Hyde Rd but we still knew them as the prison houses. I thought they were very comfortable and well-built compared with our modest house in Sutton St.

  • Re: Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I only went in them houses once, with a girl called Pat Hannon, she was cousin to Frankie Roberts, (Did you know them?) the roberts lived in the warden houses, they did look strong, but didn't the neighbours have a key to the toilets they had to share ?

  • Re: Prison ground by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 3-Sep-2011
    Mary I remember Joe Henever I used to live at 22 Ashmore St and I still see Joe these days usually in the Drs surgery.

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Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 16-May-2011
Anybody remember Mr. Hewitt, he was my form teacher at Bishop Greer, Think he also taught at st. james's?? What an interesting tale or two he had to tell.....shipwrecks etc.were any of these stories for real???? can anybody help please.Didn't his daughter do teaching as well.   
  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 16-May-2011
    Hi John, Yes jack was a teacher at st james's (and his daughter was a teacher) he was our PE and maths teacher. i remember him fondly we made him a very proud man when we won the Gt Manchester swim team relay. i also remember his stories, he could also draw a good map of the Britain with his eyes shut
    An all round good guy

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 16-May-2011
    Hi Barrie, Is my memory playing tricks, or did we have a Miss Hewitt teaching us at St. Mark's, and is that the same person? Margaret (Moffat)

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Margaret, sorry i cant remember her

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by harold wood (Member 10209840) on 12-Jun-2011
    I remember Mr Hewitt at St James he was the the best gym shoe thrower ever i also went to the school camps in Scotland with him and Miss Standen and Mr Mason.

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 1-Aug-2011
    Harold I went to Scotland with Jack Hewitt and Ma Standard we stayed on the banks of Loch Morlock, and roamed the mountains for the goast of Ben Macdooie, we also brushed the forest to clear out the deer then the shooter would come in and kill them, the nearest shop was 6mile away and the nearest village was Avimore 7 miles away
    loved it up there

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Gorton Faces by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 15-May-2011
Does anyone remember a young lad we used to call tivvy, a young friendly youth who would stop and talk to anyone in the street about the television soaps that were on at the time, he was TV mad.
  
  • Re: Gorton Faces by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 15-May-2011
    That nick name was tiv-vy

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Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 11-May-2011
What Golden Oldie means the most to you?
  
  • Re: Golden Oldie by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 12-May-2011
    Hi Mary
    What a difficult question, I was always a huge Beatles fan and there were lots of their stuff that I could have chosen and the record that conjours up the sound and sight of the sixties would be "Waterloo Sunset" by the Kinks.
    My favourite Golden Oldie though is "All or Nothing" by the Small Faces. Those vocals by Steve Marriott for me will never be beaten.
    Dave

  • Re: Golden Oldie by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 12-May-2011
    My Golden Oldie would be "Wimoweh" by the Karl Denver Trio (Decca Records).
    The reason?
    Well, although a Scot by birth, Karl Denver (Angus McKenzie) lived in Manchester most of his life and had one of the most unusual singing voices ever.
    Life was simpler in those days, music was a lot easier to "understand" and it made me happy, rather than depressed me.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 12-May-2011
    GOLDEN OLDIE TO ME IS MY MOTHER

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 12-May-2011
    Lovely answer but I mean apart from mum,s

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 13-May-2011
    Chris Farlow's "Out of Time" always reminds me of the good times we had at Top Ten Club. "Hey Jude" reminds me of a fantastic holiday in Wales. "I Got You Babe" - my first holiday romance with Steve from Dewsbury who later invited me on a potato picking holiday in Yorkshire with his family - oh the romance! How many more am I allowed Dave 'cos I'm now wallowing in nostalgia!

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 13-May-2011
    Sorry Mary - changed your sex and name there lol

  • Re: Golden Oldie by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 13-May-2011
    re golden oldies what about golden holidays , i remember going to robinsons holiday camp in towyn we stayed in a white cottage on the main rd 1 year and on the site the next year ive also stayed golden gate, browns edwards and palins and also it always seemed to be very hot when we were there

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 13-May-2011
    I know Danny. Was always the case. I think the summers of your childhood are viewed as much sunnier and hot because you spent more of your time outdoors and got more of the good weather. Now, when you're working, you miss most of it. And when it's pelting down on Saturdays and Sundays it's easier to say we had a bad summer.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-May-2011
    How many more you ask? well Carole, that was just what I was after, nice romantic reading, it took a women to reply the right way.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 13-May-2011
    The very first record I remember playing was "Here in My Heart" by Al Martino. From a nostalgic point of view I have made a CD of every song associated with every girlfriend I ever went out with throughout my life. When I play it I can shut my eyes and bring back their faces and many memories.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-May-2011
    EVERY girlfriend! Someone has had a good time, nothing like good memories to kep you going, and golden oldies (I mean songs)

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 13-May-2011
    My favourite golden oldie was Frankie Laine. My mam used to run a wool shop down in Moss Side for my sister, and would take me with her each day on the 53 bus from Belle Vue. Whilst my mam was in the shop I would be in the back playing Frankie Laine records all day; I had a wonderful time.

    As you say you are a big Beatles fan, Dave, I have a CD with every single & every album they ever did tog... more >>

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 16-May-2011
    Thanks Jack
    It is very generous of you to make that offer, I may take you up on it at some point. I am in the process of purchasing a new computer system and sorting myself out with an MP3. I have an extensive Beatles collection but yours sounds much better.
    "Here in My Heart" was the first No 1 on the first charts in Britain. It had sold loads of records before the charts started so there is no... more >>

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 16-May-2011
    Cheers Dave, just let me know if you want it. Your collection will be worth a few bob now then. I take it some of your material of the Beatles with be on records? I think it is nice to have a collection records. I have an extensive collection of Frank Sinatra records and CD's, and I don't care what anyone says to the contrary, an LP in good condition has a better sound than a CD; there is a sort o... more >>

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Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
My grandaughter has just started school at Varna St and being an ex Peacock St girl (using the word girl very loosely nowadays) I don't know much about the school. I'm sure I remember it being a senior school at some time - probably 50/60s - but my Dad, who's 82 and of course knows everything there is to know (?), says I'm wrong. If I am then please don't tell him that he's got a better memory t... more >>   
  • Re: Varna St School by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 15-May-2011
    Hi Carole I went to ST James and each week we had to go to Varna st to do wood and metal work so it was definitely a senior school in the 60's

  • Re: Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 18-May-2011
    Thanks Barry - I had a feeling it must have been but had no other responses so was beginning to think I was having a senior moment! Anyone else out there who can help me please with any info?? Cheers.

  • Re: Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 18-May-2011
    Sorry Barrie - can't spell nowadays either!

  • Re: Varna St School by Paul Hartley (Member 10226532) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Carole.
    I didn't go to Varna St myself, and was going to see first if anyone else that knew the place better came up with this. But I've heard the school was once used as an hospital, like Nichol's was at Ardwick.

  • Re: Varna St School by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    There was a story about a teacher from Central High School who was called up in WW1. The school on Whitworth Street was made into a hospital for troops. He was badly injured and brought back from the Front unconscious for many days, but woke up in his own classroom, much to his shock.

  • Re: Varna St School by jim whittaker (Member 10267375) on 16-Nov-2011
    Hi Carole,I attended Varna Street until 1954 and moved there from Peacock Street. Varna Street was 4 stories high, the bottom two were Juniors and 'upstairs' were seniors. Sorry but your Dad has got it wrong, Varna Street became a 'Senior Secondary School' the year I left. Headmaster was Mr Tricket, two other teachers I remember were Mr.Owen and Mr Gallimore. Other old mates I recall are, Derek St... more >>

  • Re: Varna St School by jim whittaker (Member 10267375) on 18-Nov-2011
    Hi Carole, Ooops, Varna Street is three stories and not four as I said. It will be a sad day when it goes. Anybody know what the plans are for the building? Cheers, Jim.

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Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 9-May-2011
1. Runaway by Del Shannon
2. Best of Lonnie Donegan on Golden Guinea Records 3. Bush with a Garrard SP25 multi-changer deck.
  
  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
    First single She Loves You - The Beatles
    First LP "With the Beatles" bought with dollars sent by my Uncle Jim in America for Christmas to us 3 girls.
    First EP Yet again The Beatles but can't remember name - track were Anna, Chains, I saw her standing there and Misery
    And our first record player was a joint Christmas present to my and my 2 sisters - it was blue and silver and that's as technica... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 10-May-2011
    Hi Carole
    The EP you mentioned with 'Misery' on was just titled "The Beatles" and came out in November 63.
    My first 45 single was "Needles and Pins" by the Searchers.
    I played it on my Dansette record player.
    The first 45 record that i ever saw was "What do you want to make those eyes at me for?" by Emile Ford and the Checkmates in 1959. It belonged to my Aunt who was a teenager at that time.
    Dave

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 10-May-2011
    Motown Chartbusters Vol 3 . I think it was seventeen & six. bought in a little record shop in gorton lane opposite the Monkey ( Vulcan ).

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by julie (Member 10255407) on 10-May-2011
    Hello everyone , hope you are all well.
    My forst single was " Groovy kind of love by Phil Collins.
    It was played over and over much to my mothere disaproval ( she thought it was a little rude ) the lyrics in it are very subtle compared to what they are about today.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 10-May-2011
    Believe it or not Dave I also have a copy of Emile Ford's "What do you wanna make those eyes at me for" but I'm sure I have it on a 78rpm - one of my Dad's collection I have to add! Must go through my old record boxes to check if my memory is playing tricks. Brain cells of a certain age and all that! I'd forgotten about the record shop on Gorton Lane, but bought most of mine from the one at the ... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 10-May-2011
    I BOUGHT MY 1ST RECORD FROM LONGSIGHT MARKET WHEN IT WSA ON STOCKPORT RD, NEAR THE DEVONSHIRE
    ABOUT 1970, I BOUGHT AN OLD ONE AND A NEW ON THE OLD 1 WAS FRANKIE VAUGHN AND THE NEW 1 WAS BAD FINGER, COME AND GET IT

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 11-May-2011
    does anyone remember the 8 track cassettes.My uncle had one in his car the tapes were nearly the size of video tapes

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by brian burnett (Member 10261349) on 15-May-2011
    I remember very well my first record because its the only one ive ever bought in my life it were called needles and pins i cant remember who sang it but i bet somebody will tell me.brian.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 15-May-2011
    Hello Brian. It was the Searchers. Great song.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    RECORD SHOP - GORTONCROSS STREET:
    Does anyone remember the first record shop on Gortoncross Street?
    It was located on the right hand side of the street as you turned into Gortoncross Street off Hyde Road.
    Something in the back of my old head tells me it may have been called WHEELER'S, but I am not sure.
    Can anyone help me out at all?

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 26-May-2011
    Hello John, I'm sure you are right. I think the shops name was Wheelers. The owners name was Edward Wheeler and I think, although he sold records, was he not also a cycle shop as well? I bought many a record from there I know that. In fact I bought my first LP from him of Mario Lanza singing Christmas songs. I only stopped going there when the record shop on Hyde Road opened and you could go in an... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 26-May-2011
    I remember Wheelers and bought my first record there in 1972 (T Rex). The owners were then in their 50's, wore old-fashioned suits and thin ties with their hair greased down in the 1940's fashion. It was hard to believe they knew all the modern music, but of course they did. You don't half miss those small shops with the personal service. Nowadays some of the assistants that work in the modern big... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    Thanks guys -
    I thought I was having a serious grey moment, but I am pleased you remembered the place too.
    You are right about the part-cycle shop too, and if my memory is really as good as I hope, I think the shop front was painted light brown in colour with the name Wheeler painted above the door and window.
    Thanks again guys.

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Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by tonih (Member 10261163) on 8-May-2011
Hi

I'm researching a book and I'm looking for anyone who went to or worked at any of these three clubs in the 1950's and 1960's.

Does anyone have any memories from this time?

  
  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 8-May-2011
    Hi, I remember the Top Ten Club at Belle Vue. I used to go there around 1963, '64. I was officially too young, you had to be sixteen. What an adventure that place was. I remember seeing Eric Clapton when he was in the Yardbirds, Dave Berry and loads of up and coming acts. The Rolling Stones even played the Top Ten Club, but my mother wouldn't allow me to go that week - she thought to Stones would ... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
    I used to go to Top Ten club every Sunday in the 60s and the first group I saw there was Herman's Hermits, followed by loads of other popular groups like the Stones, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Pinkertons Assorted Colours, Long John Baldry, Chris Farlowe (whose Out of Time is still one of my favourite ever songs),Swinging Blue Jeans etc etc. But the best ever had to be Stevie Wonder - imag... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 14-May-2011
    I used to go to the Plaza in town every week during the early sixties. You always had to wear a tie of they wouldn't let you in. I always wore a tie anyway and still do when I go out to this day, but one evening at the time, when it had been an extremely hot day, I went without one and the doorman, who used to stand at the top of the stairs, refused me entrance, so I said, "Come on. You know I alw... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by tonih (Member 10261163) on 15-May-2011
    thank you so much for the replies. All sounds like great fun. Can any of you tell me anything else about Jimmy Saville? did you know him? Also do any of you know anyone who used to work at any of the clubs?

    thank you again you have already been really helpful.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 15-May-2011
    I used to go to all off them.but in the 60's the three coins was on fountain street off market street it later became Beat city

    Barrie

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 16-May-2011
    Another couple of things I can remember about Jimmy was that he was a well known figure on Radio Luxemburg for quite some years, as well as being a household name for his seat belt advert on television - "Clunk, Click every trip". He also of course compared the first edition of "Top of the Pops" and did "Jim'll fix it". As far as I know Jimmy is still living in Leeds where he was born and will be 85 this year.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by neil clannachan (Member 10253676) on 19-May-2011
    bumped into Jimmy a couple of weeks ago in a wine shop in wendover bucks.He was visiting nearby stoke mandeville hospital. He was on form still wearnig his silver track suit and cracking aweful jokes.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by joyce sutton (Member 10260496) on 14-Jun-2011
    Wednesday night was the best night out at the Plaza big crowd of us all meet for a good time in the late 50's Ritz Friday night was also good lots of memories , then of to the country club in Cheadle

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Dennis Barker (Member 10261276) on 18-Aug-2011
    I played guitar in a group named the BLACKJACKS and we played at the Plaza on Oxford St. at Jimmy Saville's Tuesday Night D.J. Dance.
    Jimmy showed us his gym in the basement where he worked out.

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