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all sckoooools reunion. by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 1-Jun-2011
I have just been told there is a Reunion again this Sunday at The Nelson Hyde Road for all the Gorton Schools its in the afternoon i hope , If your not sure give them a ring to confirm   
  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 1-Jun-2011
    yes it is definatley in the afternoon

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by julie (Member 10255407) on 1-Jun-2011
    Hi
    The reunion's that take place do they happen regular I cant make this one but would like to in the future

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 2-Jun-2011
    not very often the last one was last june, problem is every time Alan Grafton arranges one im in Spain

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by julie (Member 10255407) on 2-Jun-2011
    So about once a year then , lucky you in Spain .
    I hope to attend a reunion at some point , I bet there really good

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 3-Jun-2011
    The answer is Yes There is a any age reunion for St Jimmys and Peacock street on Sunday at the Lord Nelson from 12 -3.00pm All are welcome I've been to the last 4 meeting and they were great Alan Grafton organises them but he has no computor so he leaves it to me to advertise on the net He try's to get them once a year but sometimes it fails so everyone please try to get to this one i... more >>

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 3-Jun-2011
    Like Barrie Roberts I went to St Jimmys from 1946-1956 and on Tuesday and Thursday (I think) we would go to Varna Street for wood work and metal work ( never forget the poker I made , really thought it was great ,but it wasnt )

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by Irene ( Dunn ) Truman (Member 10023158) on 3-Jun-2011
    Alan, for all of those who cannot make it to the reunion... pictures please!
    Cheers.

  • Re: all sckoooools reunion. by george gee (Member 10245909) on 4-Jun-2011
    I went to st jimmies and also did my woodwork at varna st school before the war born in 1926 i went to beyer peacocks in 1940 as a turning apprentice i am going to try my hardest to get to the re-union tomorrow it just depends on the availlability of the busseslooking forward to the day hoping to meet some of my old schoolmates allthe best george gee born 15-7-26

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rent man. by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 31-May-2011
Oh no, the rent mans here, shshhh!!!! BANG, BANG on the door.
No discression here. at the top of his voice ...RENT. What a sad state of affairs back in the GOOD / BAD old days.!!!! haha.
  
  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Do you remember the "knocker up"? I wonder what happend when they got up late or were ill! did the whole area feel the pinch of loss of earnings? And the chimney sweep, we kids ran after him and touched him for luck, same when we saw a sailor in uniform, and if we seen an ambulance we touched our colour, to never follow, what a lot of things we kids believed in, and never wanting to walk under a l... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Hi Mary,
    Speaking of the chimney sweep, my grandad Jack (of all trades)Reid of Abbotsbury Street decided to help a friend sweep his living room chimney.He sheeted off the fireplace so that the soot would be contained and went onto the roof and dropped a brick down the blocked chimney. The only fault was that he put the brick down the wrong chimney. What a mess in the other room.It was a real "On... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    That was so funny Dave, by the way any relation to the Reids that went to the Monastery with me? Kathleen Mary John etc?

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Mary is my Mum and is well, Aunt Margaret is still living in Gorton,Aunt Jean is in Australia but my Aunt Kath and Uncle John have both passed away John was in his early fifties.
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Wasn't Kathleen the youngest? so sorry to hear about her dyeing Margaret was very friendly with me but wouldn't remember me, we were mates because we were the neatest writers in the class and always won the Holy pictures given, I don't remember Jean. But Mary although she was a little older than me, I remember well, because one day i walked behind her, and i heard a teacher remark how lovely Mary ... more >>

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Hi Mary
    My mother Mary was the oldest,we recently celebrated her 80th then in order it was Margaret, Kath, John and then Jean.
    My mum lives on Hattersley and is so active she puts us all to shame.
    Thank you for the lovely comment about my family
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Although we were RC both Kathleen and me sent our sons to St Marks school in West Gorton (They were both in the same class) I think the son's second name was Raye, Wish your family all the best from me, it was lovely hearing about them again, and your mum missed her way according to the teacher, she might have been well known and rich

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 31-May-2011
    Yes you are right Kathleens sons Colin and Trevor both went to St Marks and Kath eventually was a chef on school dinners there. The only sibling that brought their children up in the catholic faith was Jean the youngest, her son is to be a priest when his training is complete.
    Cheers Dave

  • Re: rent man. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    That's the young lad I was trying to think of his name "Trevor" how is he these days? I worked with his dad at Slack & Cox I didn't know him, only by sight, and he was always on a motor bike, our foreman Graeme used to tell us he was his brother, but I think he was pulling our leg.

  • Re: rent man. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 1-Jun-2011
    Trevor and colin are fine. Trevor lives with his wife and two children in Wales. His dad did a bit of TT racing in the Isle of Man many years ago.
    Dave

  • Re: rent man. by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 2-Jun-2011
    we had a chinese rent collector called shin tin

  • Re: rent man. by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 7-Jun-2011
    Old Septic Knuckles.

    Ken Dodd: We used to live in Knotty Ash - just overlooking the rent.

  • Re: rent man. by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Our rent man had a permanent stooped walk and a crook back, spending so much of his time shouting through letter boxes!

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Coal fires by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 27-May-2011
Does anyone remember those misty rooms when the chimney needed sweeping ? talk about passive smoking our lungs must have taken some hammering
in those days, what with that and walking out in those dense fogs.
  
  • Re: Coal fires by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Living out here in the west of Ireland, we still have open fires.ahhh the smell of turf ( peat to you ) you cant beat it...If we have been away and driving back across country you can smell it,mmmmmmmm. On the Down side everybody smells of turf, great till you go back to G.B. then you wander why your stood alone in queue's. It just seems to impregnate your skin / clothes.I love it.

  • Re: Coal fires by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 27-May-2011
    Hey Paul that would suite you, I remember when you said you loved the smell of burning pine, is that a simualar smell John?

  • Re: Coal fires by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Not being asmoker, the smell to me is like an old man's pipe....Just have a large glass of Irish Whiskey and sit in front of the turf fire and you even TASTE the turf.mmmmmmmm.it just tickles the back of your throat!!!!nice.

  • Re: Coal fires by julie (Member 10255407) on 28-May-2011
    I agree John the smell of the turf.
    As soon as you get off the boat in Dublin you can smell the turf in the air.
    Spent many a time down the bog getting it.
    long dirty days but great fun then having to store you turf for the Range or open fire .
    The smell is magic.

  • Re: Coal fires by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 9-Jun-2011
    Does anyone recall coal fired chipshops before the introduction of gas fired friers. There was always a bucket of coal and a small shovel handy behind the counter.

  • Re: Coal fires by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Can you all remember that with a coal fire in every home, the only thing that was placed in your dustbin were ashes from the fire and burned tins, because everything else got put in the fire.
    Here's a good one for the memory:
    Do you remember your gran calling the dustbin the "midden" and nothing else?
    Dustbin-men were always called the "midden-men" in our house.
    That's a real throw-back hundre... more >>

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Shops on Gortoncross Street by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 27-May-2011
Just to start a list off, as I recall from the 60's and 70's:
Jerinas - butchers
Shores - fruit & veg
Wheelers - records & cycles
Coynes - gents outfitters (and on Wellington St)
B & L Value - fancy goods and gent... more >>
  
  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Nice One...I happily remember going into Halons and coynes, for my ben sherman shirts, evapress trousers, and crombie...even them little black bomber jackets with tartan linning...Also had a school mate Called MALCOLM ALLCOCK who worked in Jerinas ( was that the right name? )grey moment.?? also didn't Coynes have a pawn brokers on wellington st. seem to remember something around that shop.???

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 27-May-2011
    Maybe the shop was Coens??? down near Hyde rd, end, was it next to the cosmo?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by julie (Member 10255407) on 28-May-2011
    Was those jackets called the Harrington ?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 29-May-2011
    Was there a gent's outfitters on Gortoncross Street called "Weaver to Wearer?"

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 29-May-2011
    Was`nt there a Burgons grocers shop on Cross St.?. My cousin worked for them till she was transfered to the one on Stockport Rd. Levenshulme. Also at the top of Cross St, on the junction with Wellington St, there was a large furniture store called Brooks` Just over this junction, going towards Abbey Hey, there was a little corner shop called Linneys`. I recall going in there with my Gran,and there... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by steven massey (Member 10154327) on 4-Jun-2011
    if you go to this site it has a list of the traders and map of cross street as well as other gorton memories

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Does anyone remember a landlord of the Suburban in the late 70's who had the first name of Matt?
    I met him several times away from Gortoncross Street, but can't remember his surname, any help at all?

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by joyce sutton (Member 10260496) on 22-Jun-2011
    Hi does anyone remember the sweet shop on Hyde Road called EGERTONS next to the side door of the Cosmo near the Plough

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by PARTYPETE (Member 10092520) on 24-Jun-2011
    I worked in the Wood shop in 1966, also remember the L.H.D groceries, the Herbalist, Chip shop, Toy shop, Cafe, Dry cleaners, Shaw's Green Grocers, John Whites shoe shop, Paper shop (worked there as well) Off License facing the rose of England pub, Bakery near the Bank,, Prices bakery and Phil Greens that sold everything including Paraffin, until the shop burnt down :(

    I have fond memories of C... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Robert (Bob) Moore (Member 10099906) on 26-Dec-2011
    I remember the hotel on Gortoncross St, I seem to remember it was called The Suburban, and Gortoncross St was just called Cross St in the 40's and early 50's. My mam used to work as a barmaid at the Midlands Hotel on Hyde Road, and sold tickets in the Ticket Box at Belle Vue, and I worked in the car park at Belle Vue at Easter time, you wore a yellow coat, and it used to attract the sun, and you h... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Graham Corbett (Member 10271490) on 9-Mar-2012
    Hi Im new to the site, which incidently I find extremely good and interesting. I was born in a house at 3 Mount Road in Oct 1957. I grew up in Gorton through the sixties and seventies, living at various adresses there after,ie Hexham Road, Bridstowe Walk (Hattersly, Highmead Street. I have very fond memories of Gorton Cross Street. My Dad used to run a Butchers at the top end, next to a pup (I th... more >>

  • Re: Shops on Gortoncross Street by Karen (Member 10279443) on 31-Oct-2012
    Does anyone remember Barrys cafe on cross Street in the early 70s?

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West Gorton Savoy by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 26-May-2011
Does anyone remember the Savoy in Renshaw Street,
it was a shabby little cinema, but the kids loved the saturday serials, half the seats were missing, and in the dark you used to think one was there and end up falling into somebody's lap,but the price was a bit cheaper than the more select Corona, so sometimes it was only what us kids could afford
  
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Teasing kids by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 22-May-2011
Do you ever tease your grand kids? My great grandchild got carried away with the Royal wedding, and wanted to meet a Prince like kate did, so she could be a princess, she is only eight and asked me was Ptince harry eight like her, I kidded her along tha he was William's little brother, and she thought she was in with a chance of becoming a princess, she couldn't wait to see the royal wedding and p... more >>   
  • Re: Teasing kids by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    My Dad used to give us pocket-money, and tell us that the gas meter was a money-box!

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School days by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 22-May-2011
Were school days the happiest days of your life? they were good and brought plenty of friends, but I was happy to leave I think. The teachers could be a pain at times and some of the kids.   
  • Re: School days by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 23-May-2011
    I don't think I ever enjoyed going to school Mary, as I would imagine neither did the majority of us if we tell the truth. There were times when I enjoyed it but mostly I have to say that I didn't and was glad when I left. I think if most of us had had a choice of whether to go to school or not, I think the "or nots" would be in a big majority. Spurley Hey was a good school though and most of the ... more >>

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 23-May-2011
    when attending catholic schools in Scotland before comming to Gorton. I was Victimised by our class teacher every Monday morning...She would always ask me " What colour were the preist's vestments yesterday " " don't know "... I would reply as I never went to church. out here 6 lashes of the belt, and I would then say " that make you feel better " I would then receive another 2, for my cheek....s... more >>

  • Re: School days by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 24-May-2011
    That is a bad example you give there, John. I once got the strap for smoking in the school toilets, that didn't stop me smoking either, but it certainly made me more aware of not being caught again. If corporal punishment doesn't work, how come classes, even with more than forty pupils, were kept in order by the teachers, most of the time with not a word uttered. If someone did misbehave the teac... more >>

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 24-May-2011
    Well said, the teacher involved with me had a run in with my older sister a few years before....in which my mother went down to the school, and sorted the teacher out ( good style )so when I arrived at the same school it only took a few weeks before the teacher asked " did you have a sister that attended this school " cards marked from then on for me......would not happen now....and if I complaine... more >>

  • Re: School days by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 24-May-2011
    WE ALSO WAS ASKED THE COLOUR OF THE PRIEST'S VESTMENTS, AS THEY MARKED THE MASS REGISTER ON A MONDAY MORNING, AT ST FRANCIS SCHOOL GORTON,(THIS WAS THE PROOF THAT WE WERE TELLING THE TRUTH THAT WE HAD BEEN TO MASS)WE USED TO ASK A COUPLE OF OUR MATES THE COLOUR IF WE HAD NOT ATTENDED, AND THE STRAP WAS ALSO GIVEN TO US FOR MISSING MASS THINK THE STRAP WAS USED TOO OFTEN IN THEM DAYS IF WE WERE LAT... more >>

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 24-May-2011
    John,
    It's difficult for an old proddy-dog to understand just how badly some RC boys and girls must have been treated about non-attendance at church - you have my sympathy mate, and thank goodness, I hope times have changed.
    I lived in a very mixed religion area in West Gorton, and the only time I noticed the difference was when our best goalie had to attend Mass, and we always lost those games.

  • Re: School days by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 24-May-2011
    Hi John, thanks...When we moved from Scotland to Gorton I was adamant that I was not going to another Catholic school, so I ended up at the NEW SCHOOL on Taylor st. later to be Bishop Greer. what a difference that made to me I loved it, even stayed on an extra year GREAT TIMES.many thanks again.

  • Re: School days by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 9-Jun-2011
    I visited Gorton recently,and as I drove along Mount Rd., I was amazed to see that my old School,- Spurley Hey, has been demolished. The newer part which was built on most of the playing fields is still there, but the original red brick building is no more. So sad, and my heart sank at the sight of it. More damn progress I suppose.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    When I was a young fresh-faced nineteen year old Police Officer working in Gorton in the late 60's and early 70's, one of the best jobs on the day-shift was seeing school-kids across Mount Road - morning, dinner-times and in the afternoon.
    I kid you not, they were SO polite.
    These days there's a risk that they would pull a gun on you!
    How times have changed.

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    Hi John

    Did you work with Stan Egerton, as I think his first beat was Gorton? He was the DI who arrested Shipman, and I knew him through fund-raising events associated with the Scouts on Far Lane. I think Peter Topping also walked the streets of Gorton and knew Ian Brady at the time.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Peter,
    When I wasan experienced Detective working the Gorton area out of Mill Street Police Station, Stan Egerton came into the office as an Aide (a Uniformed PC who was there for six months in order to "learn the ropes" and hopefully graduate to full Detective status after training.
    I am proud to say that the lovely Stan was my Aide and I taught him all I knew and, yes, he was the first to susp... more >>

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    John, I was devastated to hear of his death in 2001. I would strongly suspect the strain of that last case contributed to his illness. It was a true horror story, and initially he had members of the public berating him in the street because he was "picking on" their favourite doctor. His contributions to society/charity are too great to list here, and I believe his funeral was attended by many peo... more >>

  • Re: School days by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 20-Jun-2011
    Just to clarify. Stan Egerton (BEM) wasn't an actual friend of mine. I knew him through a fund-raising old-boys association at the Scouts. I was in awe at what he'd done for others.

  • Re: School days by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 20-Jun-2011
    Peter,
    That would be typically Stan's reaction, he was a very kind, thoughtful, generous and straight-forward man in a world that sometimes was not as good as he.
    His charity work was totally unknown at one time, but it came as no surprise to me.
    In the six months I trained him, we had a wonderful time, he had a great sense of humour and was a real asset to the Police Service.
    Like you said Pe... more >>

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Exchanges by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
Has anyone ever exchanged items as a kid, and regretted it afterwards, I won a lovley pair of Rosary beads at school in a raffle, I exchanged them for a doll, and got a good telling off from my mum, the girl had a temprory phase that she wanted to be a catholic, and dropped the idea later when she had lost my rosary, and i haven't seen any as nice since as they were unusual colour and small size. (mum's know best)   
  • Re: Exchanges by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    I almost managed to swap my younger brother for a track-bike (no brakes and cow-horn handle-bars included)but the deal was called off when he managed to unlock the crate from the inside.
    I later built my own bike!

  • Re: Exchanges by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 17-May-2011
    Brothers, eh?!

  • Re: Exchanges by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Hi Margaret,
    It's funny, but Christopher and I grew closer after that, and I sold him the bike.
    You OK Margaret?
    Will give your regards to our kid this weekend,
    John.x.

  • Re: Exchanges by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 17-May-2011
    Hi John, I am fine thanks. Will e mail tomorrow. So glad Christopher forgave you.

  • Re: Exchanges by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 21-May-2011
    does anyone remember those bubblegum machines which gave you a bubblegum and a little toy? Once I got a small plastic Bible on the way to school and I gave it to my friend, being much brighter than I, she discovered that their was a viewfinder at the bottom and when you looked through it it had The Lord's prayer, I couldn't believe I had given it away so I promptly took it back (after a little pla... more >>

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St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 16-May-2011
Does anyone remember Mrs Clayton of St Marks school? she was the head teacher when my sons went to school, she could put the parents in order I don't know about the kids, my mother in law could stick up for herself, but i knew one instance she was gob smacked and stood with her mouth open, when Mrs clayton went over to her and a group of friends who were talking too noisely in the play ground, whi... more >>   
  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    At Gorton Mount, there was a new teacher called Mr Blackburn, who was an excellent teacher. He sorted out troublesome kids with no messing, and initially had parents queuing up to 'sort him out'. He persevered with his methods and became a highly-respected teacher who would have kids eating out of his hand. He knew how to capture a child's imagination and make everything interesting. He would cond... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    Yes the Teachers could keep the kids in order in them days, we were afraid to do wrong, it is alright the kids these days being matey with the teachers, but it gets too familier and the kids take advantage.

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    You're right Mary. Myself, I would have liked to have been treated less formally by teachers, but I agree a lot of kids would have taken too many liberties. I didn't even know I'd got a first name till I left school. ;-)

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 17-May-2011
    I REMEMBER MR BLACKBURN , HE WAS DEPUTY HEAD AT GORTON MOUNT THEN HE GOT THE HEAD TEACHERS JOB AT OLD HALL DRIVE, I WAS,NT IN HIS CLASS , I WAS IN MR BROWNS IN 4TH YEAR I USE TO LOVE THAT SCHOOL , I WAS ON THE SWIMMING TEAM FOOTBALL TEAM AND CRICKET TEAM FOR MY LAST TWO YEARS , IVE JUST THOUGHT OF A COUPLE OF TEACHERS ,MR KEAN MRS WATERS MR JUDGE I THINK MR REYNER ANR MISS RUMNEY ,

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I didn't know I was one person Peter, my sister and me were always known as the Clarke twins

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 17-May-2011
    Such is life Mary. Danny, I remember Mr Raynor and Mrs Lester, and Mr Keen. All great teachers, and Miss Smedley.

    I think you know two of my friends - Mike and Sue Ludwigsen. I do remember you vaguely from Gorton Mount. Pete

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    Was Gorton Mount the feeder school from Old Hall Drive? I remember Old Hall Drive being my first school I couldn't go to The Sacred heart until I was 5 and i had my gas mask fitted at Old hall drive when war broke out, cor I'm an old biddie, I remember that day as if it was yesterday..Why?
    because I was looking into the frying pan as mum fried bacon, and fat splashed in my eye, I tried my gas ma... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Mrs CLAYTON, and her Deputy Head, Vincent PLATT were the worse kind of teachers, a couple of inverted snobs who looked down their noses at the raggedy-arsed kids in their care.
    The bullied everyone, staff, pupils and in her case her husband - read other pages in here for dreadful stories of her approach to teaching.
    PLATT was a fool, and a weak-willed fool at that, too frightened of his career t... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    You couldn't have described these two teachers better John, this was just as i remember them,and when you went into her office, it reaked in cigarette smoke, it choked you, that women could certainly smoke, Anne Robinsons manner always reminds me of her,

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    Mary, spot on, Ann Robinson - perfect fit for old lemon lips, I never saw them smile once in seven years.

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 17-May-2011
    ( Tough Teachers )
    Age just 11 yrs I went to Levenshulme High for girls.
    On the first day we were all told that we would earn merits for good behaviour and for good effort with our work.
    We was warned that we could also lose our merits and get de-merits, if we got 3 of these then we would automatically get a detention.
    I was really afraid at the thought of de-merits and the detention thing, n... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 17-May-2011
    on a nicer note !
    Good old Mr Raynor ( Gorton Mount )
    He taught us caligraphy, and if our team got so many gold stars we would all get a brand new pencil, very exciting,
    He used to smoke a pipe and we saw him smoke it to in the classroom , he used to give us girls his tobacco tins to play hop scotch.

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Julie. Mr Raynor was one of the best. A very nice man, and when he read a story he could capture your attention better than any tv programme. I've said before but young girls adored him, and they would hang onto his arms walking down Mount Road every morning and night for almost generations of pupils. Those who couldn't get a place on his arms would swarm round him. It really pains me to think ... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 18-May-2011
    HI PETER,OF COURSE YOU KNOW ME. I KNOW YOU , I KNOW THAT YOU LIVED ONTRUST RD NEXT TO THE COOPERS AND I ALSO KNOW THAT YOU HAVE A BROTHER CALLED DAVID

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Danny. Yes, I do know you, but it's so long ago, I only remember you vaguely. You may have had more contact with our Dave as you went to Spurley Hey. Pete

  • Re: St Marks by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 18-May-2011
    I remember a teacher at Gorton Mount in the 50's who was just the same as Mr Raynor in that he also always had the girls on his arms walking around the playground, with swarms of other girls following around him. His name was Mr Critchley, a very handsome man indeed who always reminded me of the film star, "Cornel Wilde". Wonderful man and wonderful days, but like you say Peter, today they would p... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 18-May-2011
    Oh he was a lovely person thats true, he was also firm as a teacher always had good control over the class not that there was really ant uncontrolable classes back then.
    We used to hang around after him because of his tobacco tins we thought that by hanging onto his arms that we would get the tin lol.
    Awww the poor man must have been in agony but what a wonderful teacher

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 18-May-2011
    Do you remember the creative dancing we used to do in PE it was filmed many times I wonder what has happened to the films that were made

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    The Police have got them Julie. lol

  • Re: St Marks by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 19-May-2011
    There was a wonderful teacher at St Marks' in the 1950's.
    She was Mrs BUTTERWORTH who loved children and taught me to read and write, and I saw her years later when she was a very old and frail lady, but still had a wonderful charm and twinkle in her eye.
    I owe her everything, what a lovely lovely lady she was.

  • Re: St Marks by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 19-May-2011
    HI PETE I DID,NT GO TO SPURLEY I WENT TO BURNAGE A MUCH POSHER SCHOOL. AH

  • Re: St Marks by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    That was posh Danny. I applied and they gave me Central.

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 19-May-2011
    Burnage High for boys then Danny
    Often the boys at lunch time would hang around Levenshulme high for girls as it was not far from the upper school (Errwood Rd).
    Our tennis courts was seen from the main Road and we often saw the boys hanging around.
    There was a park opposite or a bowling green, some of us used to bunk off the odd lesson and meet up with some boys.
    My mother at the time was a n... more >>

  • Re: St Marks by julie (Member 10255407) on 19-May-2011
    The three schools my mother picked for us was in order Levenshulme,Central for girls,and Parrswood as I have said Karen,myself and Angela
    all went to Levenshulme.
    Levenshulme used to be a grammer school but went comprehensive the year Our Karen went and I went the year after and Angela the year after that.
    The teachers used to wear the cap and gown but that changed after a short while.
    Gordon... more >>

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Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 16-May-2011
Does anyone know any of the families off the prison ground 1939 -55 that was the time I lived there in Forbes Street, it would be nice to know how the old neighbours are getting on.   
  • Re: Prison ground by Kate Nowell (Member 10137684) on 17-May-2011
    I knew Mr and Mrs Newton and their three children, Donald, Marion and Geoffrey. Opposite lived the Hennevers who I think had a son and a daughter. Mr Hennever worked as a postman. We always had our bonfires in the big back yards there. Treacle toffee, potatoes roasted in the fire. Does anybody remember the wash-houses there?

  • Re: Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I remember The Henevors but I thought they lived in the warden houses (On Hyde Road) or was that later? Joe the son was in the Coldstream Guards like my husband, that is how I remember them, yes the dad was a postman.

  • Re: Prison ground by Kate Nowell (Member 10137684) on 17-May-2011
    Yes, you're right Mary, the houses were on Hyde Rd but we still knew them as the prison houses. I thought they were very comfortable and well-built compared with our modest house in Sutton St.

  • Re: Prison ground by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 17-May-2011
    I only went in them houses once, with a girl called Pat Hannon, she was cousin to Frankie Roberts, (Did you know them?) the roberts lived in the warden houses, they did look strong, but didn't the neighbours have a key to the toilets they had to share ?

  • Re: Prison ground by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 3-Sep-2011
    Mary I remember Joe Henever I used to live at 22 Ashmore St and I still see Joe these days usually in the Drs surgery.

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Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 16-May-2011
Anybody remember Mr. Hewitt, he was my form teacher at Bishop Greer, Think he also taught at st. james's?? What an interesting tale or two he had to tell.....shipwrecks etc.were any of these stories for real???? can anybody help please.Didn't his daughter do teaching as well.   
  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 16-May-2011
    Hi John, Yes jack was a teacher at st james's (and his daughter was a teacher) he was our PE and maths teacher. i remember him fondly we made him a very proud man when we won the Gt Manchester swim team relay. i also remember his stories, he could also draw a good map of the Britain with his eyes shut
    An all round good guy

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 16-May-2011
    Hi Barrie, Is my memory playing tricks, or did we have a Miss Hewitt teaching us at St. Mark's, and is that the same person? Margaret (Moffat)

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Margaret, sorry i cant remember her

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by harold wood (Member 10209840) on 12-Jun-2011
    I remember Mr Hewitt at St James he was the the best gym shoe thrower ever i also went to the school camps in Scotland with him and Miss Standen and Mr Mason.

  • Re: Jack Hewitt ( teacher ) by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 1-Aug-2011
    Harold I went to Scotland with Jack Hewitt and Ma Standard we stayed on the banks of Loch Morlock, and roamed the mountains for the goast of Ben Macdooie, we also brushed the forest to clear out the deer then the shooter would come in and kill them, the nearest shop was 6mile away and the nearest village was Avimore 7 miles away
    loved it up there

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Gorton Faces by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 15-May-2011
Does anyone remember a young lad we used to call tivvy, a young friendly youth who would stop and talk to anyone in the street about the television soaps that were on at the time, he was TV mad.
  
  • Re: Gorton Faces by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 15-May-2011
    That nick name was tiv-vy

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Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 11-May-2011
What Golden Oldie means the most to you?
  
  • Re: Golden Oldie by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 12-May-2011
    Hi Mary
    What a difficult question, I was always a huge Beatles fan and there were lots of their stuff that I could have chosen and the record that conjours up the sound and sight of the sixties would be "Waterloo Sunset" by the Kinks.
    My favourite Golden Oldie though is "All or Nothing" by the Small Faces. Those vocals by Steve Marriott for me will never be beaten.
    Dave

  • Re: Golden Oldie by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 12-May-2011
    My Golden Oldie would be "Wimoweh" by the Karl Denver Trio (Decca Records).
    The reason?
    Well, although a Scot by birth, Karl Denver (Angus McKenzie) lived in Manchester most of his life and had one of the most unusual singing voices ever.
    Life was simpler in those days, music was a lot easier to "understand" and it made me happy, rather than depressed me.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 12-May-2011
    GOLDEN OLDIE TO ME IS MY MOTHER

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 12-May-2011
    Lovely answer but I mean apart from mum,s

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 13-May-2011
    Chris Farlow's "Out of Time" always reminds me of the good times we had at Top Ten Club. "Hey Jude" reminds me of a fantastic holiday in Wales. "I Got You Babe" - my first holiday romance with Steve from Dewsbury who later invited me on a potato picking holiday in Yorkshire with his family - oh the romance! How many more am I allowed Dave 'cos I'm now wallowing in nostalgia!

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 13-May-2011
    Sorry Mary - changed your sex and name there lol

  • Re: Golden Oldie by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 13-May-2011
    re golden oldies what about golden holidays , i remember going to robinsons holiday camp in towyn we stayed in a white cottage on the main rd 1 year and on the site the next year ive also stayed golden gate, browns edwards and palins and also it always seemed to be very hot when we were there

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 13-May-2011
    I know Danny. Was always the case. I think the summers of your childhood are viewed as much sunnier and hot because you spent more of your time outdoors and got more of the good weather. Now, when you're working, you miss most of it. And when it's pelting down on Saturdays and Sundays it's easier to say we had a bad summer.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-May-2011
    How many more you ask? well Carole, that was just what I was after, nice romantic reading, it took a women to reply the right way.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 13-May-2011
    The very first record I remember playing was "Here in My Heart" by Al Martino. From a nostalgic point of view I have made a CD of every song associated with every girlfriend I ever went out with throughout my life. When I play it I can shut my eyes and bring back their faces and many memories.

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 13-May-2011
    EVERY girlfriend! Someone has had a good time, nothing like good memories to kep you going, and golden oldies (I mean songs)

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 13-May-2011
    My favourite golden oldie was Frankie Laine. My mam used to run a wool shop down in Moss Side for my sister, and would take me with her each day on the 53 bus from Belle Vue. Whilst my mam was in the shop I would be in the back playing Frankie Laine records all day; I had a wonderful time.

    As you say you are a big Beatles fan, Dave, I have a CD with every single & every album they ever did tog... more >>

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 16-May-2011
    Thanks Jack
    It is very generous of you to make that offer, I may take you up on it at some point. I am in the process of purchasing a new computer system and sorting myself out with an MP3. I have an extensive Beatles collection but yours sounds much better.
    "Here in My Heart" was the first No 1 on the first charts in Britain. It had sold loads of records before the charts started so there is no... more >>

  • Re: Golden Oldie by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 16-May-2011
    Cheers Dave, just let me know if you want it. Your collection will be worth a few bob now then. I take it some of your material of the Beatles with be on records? I think it is nice to have a collection records. I have an extensive collection of Frank Sinatra records and CD's, and I don't care what anyone says to the contrary, an LP in good condition has a better sound than a CD; there is a sort o... more >>

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Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
My grandaughter has just started school at Varna St and being an ex Peacock St girl (using the word girl very loosely nowadays) I don't know much about the school. I'm sure I remember it being a senior school at some time - probably 50/60s - but my Dad, who's 82 and of course knows everything there is to know (?), says I'm wrong. If I am then please don't tell him that he's got a better memory t... more >>   
  • Re: Varna St School by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 15-May-2011
    Hi Carole I went to ST James and each week we had to go to Varna st to do wood and metal work so it was definitely a senior school in the 60's

  • Re: Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 18-May-2011
    Thanks Barry - I had a feeling it must have been but had no other responses so was beginning to think I was having a senior moment! Anyone else out there who can help me please with any info?? Cheers.

  • Re: Varna St School by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 18-May-2011
    Sorry Barrie - can't spell nowadays either!

  • Re: Varna St School by Paul Hartley (Member 10226532) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Carole.
    I didn't go to Varna St myself, and was going to see first if anyone else that knew the place better came up with this. But I've heard the school was once used as an hospital, like Nichol's was at Ardwick.

  • Re: Varna St School by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 19-May-2011
    There was a story about a teacher from Central High School who was called up in WW1. The school on Whitworth Street was made into a hospital for troops. He was badly injured and brought back from the Front unconscious for many days, but woke up in his own classroom, much to his shock.

  • Re: Varna St School by jim whittaker (Member 10267375) on 16-Nov-2011
    Hi Carole,I attended Varna Street until 1954 and moved there from Peacock Street. Varna Street was 4 stories high, the bottom two were Juniors and 'upstairs' were seniors. Sorry but your Dad has got it wrong, Varna Street became a 'Senior Secondary School' the year I left. Headmaster was Mr Tricket, two other teachers I remember were Mr.Owen and Mr Gallimore. Other old mates I recall are, Derek St... more >>

  • Re: Varna St School by jim whittaker (Member 10267375) on 18-Nov-2011
    Hi Carole, Ooops, Varna Street is three stories and not four as I said. It will be a sad day when it goes. Anybody know what the plans are for the building? Cheers, Jim.

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Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 9-May-2011
1. Runaway by Del Shannon
2. Best of Lonnie Donegan on Golden Guinea Records 3. Bush with a Garrard SP25 multi-changer deck.
  
  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
    First single She Loves You - The Beatles
    First LP "With the Beatles" bought with dollars sent by my Uncle Jim in America for Christmas to us 3 girls.
    First EP Yet again The Beatles but can't remember name - track were Anna, Chains, I saw her standing there and Misery
    And our first record player was a joint Christmas present to my and my 2 sisters - it was blue and silver and that's as technica... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 10-May-2011
    Hi Carole
    The EP you mentioned with 'Misery' on was just titled "The Beatles" and came out in November 63.
    My first 45 single was "Needles and Pins" by the Searchers.
    I played it on my Dansette record player.
    The first 45 record that i ever saw was "What do you want to make those eyes at me for?" by Emile Ford and the Checkmates in 1959. It belonged to my Aunt who was a teenager at that time.
    Dave

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 10-May-2011
    Motown Chartbusters Vol 3 . I think it was seventeen & six. bought in a little record shop in gorton lane opposite the Monkey ( Vulcan ).

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by julie (Member 10255407) on 10-May-2011
    Hello everyone , hope you are all well.
    My forst single was " Groovy kind of love by Phil Collins.
    It was played over and over much to my mothere disaproval ( she thought it was a little rude ) the lyrics in it are very subtle compared to what they are about today.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 10-May-2011
    Believe it or not Dave I also have a copy of Emile Ford's "What do you wanna make those eyes at me for" but I'm sure I have it on a 78rpm - one of my Dad's collection I have to add! Must go through my old record boxes to check if my memory is playing tricks. Brain cells of a certain age and all that! I'd forgotten about the record shop on Gorton Lane, but bought most of mine from the one at the ... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 10-May-2011
    I BOUGHT MY 1ST RECORD FROM LONGSIGHT MARKET WHEN IT WSA ON STOCKPORT RD, NEAR THE DEVONSHIRE
    ABOUT 1970, I BOUGHT AN OLD ONE AND A NEW ON THE OLD 1 WAS FRANKIE VAUGHN AND THE NEW 1 WAS BAD FINGER, COME AND GET IT

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 11-May-2011
    does anyone remember the 8 track cassettes.My uncle had one in his car the tapes were nearly the size of video tapes

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by brian burnett (Member 10261349) on 15-May-2011
    I remember very well my first record because its the only one ive ever bought in my life it were called needles and pins i cant remember who sang it but i bet somebody will tell me.brian.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 15-May-2011
    Hello Brian. It was the Searchers. Great song.

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    RECORD SHOP - GORTONCROSS STREET:
    Does anyone remember the first record shop on Gortoncross Street?
    It was located on the right hand side of the street as you turned into Gortoncross Street off Hyde Road.
    Something in the back of my old head tells me it may have been called WHEELER'S, but I am not sure.
    Can anyone help me out at all?

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 26-May-2011
    Hello John, I'm sure you are right. I think the shops name was Wheelers. The owners name was Edward Wheeler and I think, although he sold records, was he not also a cycle shop as well? I bought many a record from there I know that. In fact I bought my first LP from him of Mario Lanza singing Christmas songs. I only stopped going there when the record shop on Hyde Road opened and you could go in an... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 26-May-2011
    I remember Wheelers and bought my first record there in 1972 (T Rex). The owners were then in their 50's, wore old-fashioned suits and thin ties with their hair greased down in the 1940's fashion. It was hard to believe they knew all the modern music, but of course they did. You don't half miss those small shops with the personal service. Nowadays some of the assistants that work in the modern big... more >>

  • Re: Your First 45 Single, First LP and First Record Player by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    Thanks guys -
    I thought I was having a serious grey moment, but I am pleased you remembered the place too.
    You are right about the part-cycle shop too, and if my memory is really as good as I hope, I think the shop front was painted light brown in colour with the name Wheeler painted above the door and window.
    Thanks again guys.

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Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by tonih (Member 10261163) on 8-May-2011
Hi

I'm researching a book and I'm looking for anyone who went to or worked at any of these three clubs in the 1950's and 1960's.

Does anyone have any memories from this time?

  
  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 8-May-2011
    Hi, I remember the Top Ten Club at Belle Vue. I used to go there around 1963, '64. I was officially too young, you had to be sixteen. What an adventure that place was. I remember seeing Eric Clapton when he was in the Yardbirds, Dave Berry and loads of up and coming acts. The Rolling Stones even played the Top Ten Club, but my mother wouldn't allow me to go that week - she thought to Stones would ... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Carole Glennon (Member 10249906) on 9-May-2011
    I used to go to Top Ten club every Sunday in the 60s and the first group I saw there was Herman's Hermits, followed by loads of other popular groups like the Stones, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Pinkertons Assorted Colours, Long John Baldry, Chris Farlowe (whose Out of Time is still one of my favourite ever songs),Swinging Blue Jeans etc etc. But the best ever had to be Stevie Wonder - imag... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 14-May-2011
    I used to go to the Plaza in town every week during the early sixties. You always had to wear a tie of they wouldn't let you in. I always wore a tie anyway and still do when I go out to this day, but one evening at the time, when it had been an extremely hot day, I went without one and the doorman, who used to stand at the top of the stairs, refused me entrance, so I said, "Come on. You know I alw... more >>

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by tonih (Member 10261163) on 15-May-2011
    thank you so much for the replies. All sounds like great fun. Can any of you tell me anything else about Jimmy Saville? did you know him? Also do any of you know anyone who used to work at any of the clubs?

    thank you again you have already been really helpful.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by barrie roberts (Member 10256887) on 15-May-2011
    I used to go to all off them.but in the 60's the three coins was on fountain street off market street it later became Beat city

    Barrie

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 16-May-2011
    Another couple of things I can remember about Jimmy was that he was a well known figure on Radio Luxemburg for quite some years, as well as being a household name for his seat belt advert on television - "Clunk, Click every trip". He also of course compared the first edition of "Top of the Pops" and did "Jim'll fix it". As far as I know Jimmy is still living in Leeds where he was born and will be 85 this year.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by neil clannachan (Member 10253676) on 19-May-2011
    bumped into Jimmy a couple of weeks ago in a wine shop in wendover bucks.He was visiting nearby stoke mandeville hospital. He was on form still wearnig his silver track suit and cracking aweful jokes.

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by joyce sutton (Member 10260496) on 14-Jun-2011
    Wednesday night was the best night out at the Plaza big crowd of us all meet for a good time in the late 50's Ritz Friday night was also good lots of memories , then of to the country club in Cheadle

  • Re: Top Ten Club, Three Coins, Plaza Ballroom 1950's and 60's by Dennis Barker (Member 10261276) on 18-Aug-2011
    I played guitar in a group named the BLACKJACKS and we played at the Plaza on Oxford St. at Jimmy Saville's Tuesday Night D.J. Dance.
    Jimmy showed us his gym in the basement where he worked out.

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Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 7-May-2011
For any ex Thomas streeters. There is a facebook page with some old photo's if anyone is intersted. I found a photo of a friend i have been looking for. phew!!! at last.   
  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 7-May-2011
    oops meant to say, its called Wenlock way page but is also for ex Thomas street pupils.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 18-May-2011
    Hi Diane
    One of the other threads talk of Mr Platt and Mrs Clayton of St Marks and the bullying by them.
    Can you remember Miss Kenyon at Thomas Street? She used to terrify me and knocked my confidence back a jolt. She once was on playground duty and I ran over my cousins hopscotch so she grabbed my ankle and tipped me up like a rag doll and slapped the top of my legs in front of all the school. ... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 22-May-2011
    Hello Dave, I just saw your reply, the name Mrs Kenyon rings no bells, my evil teacher was the art teacher..Marsland I think its name was? are you in any of the pics?

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Kate Nowell (Member 10137684) on 22-May-2011
    I remember Mr Marsland, didn't he take the standard 3 class? I don't remember him being evil but there were one or two female sadistic teachers downstairs whose names I can't remember.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 23-May-2011
    Hello Kate, I dont't imagine he was evil per se, only that he committed an evil act against me . He was not my teacher , he only took us for an art class once and it was in that class which the incident took place. My teacher was Mrss Pennington and another Lady who I always remembered as Mrs Helen's but I have as yet to have that confirmed by anyone I have so far talked with who attended Thomas ... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 23-May-2011
    Hi Diane & Kate
    I was at Ray Hattons 60th recently with a Angela Helsby from Thommo, who said she was told that Mrs Kenyon and the Mrs Armitage were sacked after we had left the juniors as there had been many complaints about Mrs Kenyon that never went further than the head of the juniors Mrs Armitage.
    It would appesr that they were partners.
    Oh Dear!!

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 23-May-2011
    Did either of them take the nursery class? I had a very strange experience in that class, and were either of you in the nursery class.. Dave, when you say partners do you mean as in like they were 'together' while I am here, does any Thomas streeters remember a girl called Christine, quite tall and lived in Brookhouse flats, I have looked for her for some time .I tried the friends reunited sit... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 24-May-2011
    Diane, I was told that they were 'Together' 'Or on the other Bus' or 'Wore comfortable shoes' however you want to put it. The thing is their persuasion had nothing to do with anyone else until it was discovered that one was covering for the others bullying behaviour.
    I was in the early nursery class at Thomas St,(I had been in St Benedicts nursery from 12 months old)I lived next to St Marks but t... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    This is a long shot:
    Is there anyone out there that was at Thomas Street School in the 1930's and might remember two girls' names:
    Joan CANNAR or KENNA (my mother who lived at 124 Clowes Street, West Gorton, or Elsie BROCKLEHURST (my aunt).
    I know its a long time ago, but if you or your parents knew them, I would love to hear from you - thank you.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 26-May-2011
    John it's another long shot, but I have been talking to my sister in law for you, as I have heard her mention the name Brocklehurst in the past (She lived on Margaret Street, and used to go to Armitage Street school) And she said she writes to Australia to an old school mate, who knows a John Brocklehurst, now living in Australia, he went to Armitage Street School, and is an old West Gorton lad, a... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 26-May-2011
    Hi Mary,
    Perhaps I had the school wrong, you may be right.
    Elsie Brocklehurst is still alive and in her late 80's or early 90's, and lives in the Denton area.
    She married my uncle John HOLMES around 1947 when he came home after the war, and they had one daughter, my cousin Margaret.
    My late mother Joan HOLMES nee CANNAR or KENNA used to tell me she was at school with Elsie, and they remained f... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 26-May-2011
    Hello Dave, Yes that's how I would understand it a nice little nexus of power and control. I remember feeling very let down by the headmistress over some issue. I don't remember nursery teachers names although I remember lots of nice things about my time in the nursery. Oh happy days !!!

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Dave Wright (Member 10256925) on 27-May-2011
    Hi Diane
    The only teachers names that I remember are Mrs McDonald, Mr Evans, Mr Crutchley, Mr Marsland and Mr Hampson.
    Dave

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by Diane Farmer (Member 10250547) on 28-May-2011
    I went back to Thomas street recently for a look around. They are building flats on the old school site. Mr Evans, Mrs Pennington and Mrs Helens were my main teachers, the others I dont't really remember oh and there was an Indian man who was a teacher when I was there, he was blowing a whistle?
    get in line lol

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by eyematopgeeza (Member 10262725) on 26-Jun-2011
    god all them thomas st teachers i remember but only after there names was mentioned even some of the people on here there names ring a bell may even have been in my class or am i just imagining it ime 52 now so went there in the 60s all i can remember is carrying the school benches out with the thick gym mats to have our class photo taken funny enough the name carol farmer seems to ring a bell bu... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by eyematopgeeza (Member 10262725) on 26-Jun-2011
    god all them thomas st teachers i remember but only after there names was mentioned even some of the people on here there names ring a bell may even have been in my class or am i just imagining it ime 52 now so went there in the 60s all i can remember is carrying the school benches out with the thick gym mats to have our class photo taken funny enough the name carol farmer seems to ring a bell bu... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by eyematopgeeza (Member 10262725) on 26-Jun-2011
    put this in correct section john holmes rings a bell as well

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 11-Jul-2011
    Get in touch with your surname mate, I may well be able to help you out, John.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 2-Sep-2011
    I remember Mr Marsland he used to look after the cricket team That I played in . We used to play on a concrete wicket on Bennet street wreck. the school football used to play on as well.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 3-Sep-2011
    Re Thomas St School, the headmaster when I left was mr Evans and my final year teacher was mr Scholes who had a wooden leg.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 7-Sep-2011
    Diane. do you remember a teacher calloed Mr Payne.I was in his class in 1949. I liked him and always wondered what happend to him.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by derek Barber (Member 10264804) on 30-Oct-2011
    I keep watching the Thomas street school messages and waiting to see some old names from my year. I left in 1952 and Iremember names like Raymond Jackman,Bill Berry,Derek Keeling, lauwrence Rothwell, Tony Dean,Billy Jones, Alan Edwards. Does anyone know these old mates of mine.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by William Briggs (Member 10267694) on 22-Nov-2011
    This is a message for Dave Wright member 10256925. I have only recently discovered this message board and your comments about Thomas street school have opened a can of worms inside my head. Ill bet you never told anyone about miss Kenyon and miss Armitage at the time, and and I have kept my memories of that pair of reptiles suppressed for fifty years. You mention physical attacks and shattered con... more >>

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by tony thompson (Member 10271454) on 8-Mar-2012
    Just found this site.Amazing how the memories flood back.I remember Mr.Hampson,i think he taught science.I also remember the cricket and football played on shale at Bennett st.I left Thomas st.in 1968 for Central high.

  • Re: Thomas Street School. by susan game (Member 10270119) on 16-Apr-2012
    I went to Thomas St school in the 50's. Left in '59. I was in Mr Marslands class when I took the 11+ and can remember being in Mrs Macdonalds class who was also the art teacher and Mr Hampson was the science teacher. We lived on Hoylake ST when I first went there but by the time I left we were living on Cross Lane. There was always a peculiar smell near the school - was it the factory opposite? Do... more >>

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Good old days? by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
GOOD OLD DAYS? (you must be joking) from a womens point of view, these times are better, the men shop more now there are supermarkets, they don't mind pushing their off springs about either, and the gadgets to help the women are really amazing, no more the nappies to wash, or the washing to scrub, and the kitchen is no more a task it was, we had a cold water tap (No hot water, unless we heated it ... more >>   
  • Re: Good old days? by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 27-May-2011
    You are quite right Mary, I'm sure from a woman's perspective it is much easier today than it ever was in the 30's, 40's and 50's etc. Life for a woman in those days was extremely hard and I don't think most men had very much idea just how hard. The old saying, "A woman's work is never done," was a very accurate description. I remember a mate of mine at work once saying to me, "If women want equal... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 27-May-2011
    well said Jack thanks for the honesty, by the way what books have you written? I have done one, well i haven't exactley done anything with it, I didn't know the next move after writing it, and it only has about 60 pages, called "Lions in My childhood"

  • Re: Good old days? by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 30-May-2011
    Hello Mary, I am only writing the one book - my autobiography and family history. At the moment it is about 900 pages long and not finished. I have been working on it and researching it for donkeys years. I found a little brother I never knew about who died at child birth and is buried in Gorton Cemetery. I researched my granddad's life on my mam's side, who was in the Manchester police force and ... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 30-May-2011
    what a lovely thing for you to write for your future relatives, but it must take a lot of patience, I don't think i am good enough with my grammer to do anything, but I keep saying i will try a little harder and make my book have more pages it starts with the war begining, my evacuation, and the happy days near Belle vue, with a party the yanky soldiers made for us kids, and the speedway and good ... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 30-May-2011
    By the way Jack, I keep meaning to mention to you, I once knew a girl called Flo Forshaw, lived on Great Jackson Street, was she any relation to you? she went about with friends called Jean Masterman and Barbara Simpson

  • Re: Good old days? by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 31-May-2011
    No, Mary, I don't have a Flo Forshaw in my family tree, though that's not to say that she isn't a relative, because I have always reckoned that if someone of the same surname lives in or near to the area where the rest of the family live, it is more than a probability that they could be related. Now if I knew who her grandparents were? By the way, I'm quite sure your book about your early life dur... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 31-May-2011
    Talking of Rylance Street, I worked at Waxes button works in Rylance Street in the early 1950,s You asked about my evacuation, well the whole school "Sacred Heart Gorton" was evacuated to Higher Poynton, I was only 6 years of age, but our parents panicked at the beginning of the war, my twin and I thought we had gone miles away. My dad went mad when my mum brought me and my twin home after only th... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by Jack Forshaw (Member 10258735) on 1-Jun-2011
    I was six months old when we lived in Rylance Street. One night during a German air raid we went into the communal shelter, then there was an earth shattering blast, so my mam said, and as my pram was hurled from one side of the shelter to the other, a man through his body over me to shield me from the falling debris otherwise I would probably have been badly hurt or worse. When we eventually came... more >>

  • Re: Good old days? by eyematopgeeza (Member 10262725) on 26-Jun-2011
    john holmes rings a bell as well

  • Re: Good old days? by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 12-Jul-2011
    Send me an email mate at:
    j.holmes47@sky.com
    John.

  • Re: Good old days? by Alan Bowden (Member 10251584) on 1-Aug-2011
    Hi Jack with you mentioning (on the Knowhere site )Len Johnson the black boxer it brought back memories for me when I was a teenager knockin about Gorton as a teddy-boy a mate of mine was Ricky Johnson of Ardwick who was said at the time to be relateted to Len , Ricky was also a boxer and claimed to be the grandson of Len ,I think .... Ricky would be the same age as me now about 70 Just wonder... more >>

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Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 5-May-2011
In my younger days, we really got our moneys worth out of a Newspaper, it was used as a table cloth, to blow the fire up with a shovel behind it, as fire starting twisting it first so it would burn longer underneath the fire wood, as toilet paper, or taken clean to the chippy, so they could use it, there must be more things it was useful for,that I have forgotten, but it was well worth the money   
  • Re: Newspaper by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 6-May-2011
    What about drying wet shoes, mum used to stuff them in to dry my shoes. And cleaning the windows.

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 6-May-2011
    What about dipping them in vinegar to clean the windows - years before J-Cloths were even thought of?
    What about stuffing them in broken window panes to keep the wind and rain out - we had one in our bedroom window in Clowes Street for two years - really caring landlord?

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 6-May-2011
    Sorry John, missed your reference to cleaning the windows mate.

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 6-May-2011
    This may have just been my Dad, but what about laying it underneath oil-cloth (poor man's linoleum) directly onto a concrete or flagged kitchen floor to keep the damp out, or directly onto wooden floor-boards to keep the droughts from coming through - oh the luxury of West Gorton living.
    The only carpet we had was on the stairs, and that was ex-British Rail carpet "recovered" from refurbished rai... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 6-May-2011
    Also going to the butchers, he would wrap up WET things like tripe and offal ( lights ) even " a bone for the dog ) or a Sheeps head...which makes a lovely stew,mmmmmmmmmmm.

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 6-May-2011
    John, great memory, and when I lived on Cambert Lane we had a butcher close by, and he had one joke only, and it was this:
    Customer - "have you got a sheep's head?"
    Butcher - "no, it's just the way my hair's cut".
    I must have heard that dozens of times.
    Funny thought, even as a life-long Gorton lad, I have never eaten tripe nor had sheep's head stew - no idea why.
    We seemed to survive on Chip... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
    What memories you have, thanks for all that feed back. I remember as a little girl stood ear wagging as my mum was talking to a neighbour, my mum had given her some surprising news, and she shouted out in amazement "Good Gorton Isle-landers" bet you've never heard that one before you Gortonians, I blushed thinking she was swearing and i shouldn't be listening, I was only 5 years old.

  • Re: Newspaper by DANNY COLEMAN (Member 10221392) on 6-May-2011
    RE THE BUTCHERS ON CAMBERT LANE , MY DAD TOOK ME THERE WHEN I WAS IN MY TROLLEY AND WENT HOME WITHOUT ME, IT WAS ONLY WHEN MY MAM ASKED WHRE I WAS HE REMEMBERED, NOT ONCE BUT TWICE THIS HAPPENED . DO YOU THINK HE WAS TRYING TO TELL ME SOMETHING

  • Re: Newspaper by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 6-May-2011
    Danny, one Christmas morning my parents greeted me with a handful of £10 notes, saying "Look what we've got for you!"

    They'd only gone and sold me. :-)

    (Ken Dodd joke)

  • Re: Newspaper by john carlton (Member 10248427) on 6-May-2011
    If I remember rightly there was even Tripe shops UCP tripe??? think one was in Stockport in the square??? Mersey sq.?? Pigs trotters, black tripe white tripe and honeycomb. mmmmmmm

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
    There was a tripe shop on Hyde Road West Gorton
    in later years, near Mawson,s (Pramland we used to call Mawson's) and does anyone remember Mrs Turner at the sweet shop? we used to call her "shirring Turner" because she couldn't pronounce the "L" She was a nice soul though, she used to let us spend our next months sweet coupons in advance.

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
    But talking about Newspapers, do you remember Mr Jones at the newsagents on the corner of Margaret street (Hyde Road) he used to give us a handful of sweets if we took him potatoe pealings for his pigs to eat (Don't know where he lived) but I cannot get over how wrinkled his face was, a lovely man, but his face was so creased I used to think it looked like a screwed up newspaper, shame on me, hope... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by Paul Hartley (Member 10226532) on 6-May-2011
    I use to think it was magic to place a piece of waxed paper from a loaf of bread over a newspaper picture, rub over it with the back of a spoon. Then transfer the image onto a piece of drawing paper in the same way, shading over it with a pencil afterwards made it look as if you had drawn it yourself.

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
    Hi Paul glad to see you on here again, always surprises me when you come up with things I had forgotten. Makes me feel as young as your generation when you remember the same shops, mind you, I was the mother . you was the toddler

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 6-May-2011
    John,
    I lived in a converted Beswick Co-op Tripe Shop at 126 Clowes Street, West Gorton from being three months old (1948) to when we moved to Cambert Lane Gorton in 1961.
    Number 130 was the Beswick Co-op Grocers (Clowes Street/Robert Street corner), number 128 was the Beswick Co-op Butchers and where I lived was the disused Beswick Co-op Tripe Shop, with its display window painted half-way up w... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 6-May-2011
    1948 that brings back memories i was just leaving St Francis School, would love to go back to that year and start again, form 15 years of age. you didn't have far to travel to school then John

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 7-May-2011
    That's true, we walked everywhere, and in retrospect distances we thought were huge were, in reality, relatively short.
    A walk from Clowes Street to Gorton Park seemed to take ages and seemed to be miles away.
    If you tried that today, it's a matter of a few hundred yards and would take you a matter of minutes.
    Strange how time and distance change with age.
    I mentioned the width of the old Clow... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by Margaret Rochford (Member 10257531) on 7-May-2011
    I know just what you mean, John. When the old property was demolished, you would wonder how all those houses were in that area, and all those salt of the earth families.

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 7-May-2011
    Hi Margaret,
    Hope you are well, and will write Monday.
    You are spot on with the size of the houses when they knocked them down, it was amazing to see how many were in such a small area.
    They just bulldozed them into the cellars, burnt all the wood and sold the tiles and chimney pots to reclamation people.
    I would love to see Time Team excavate the old areas, it would be fascinating.
    Take care... more >>

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 17-May-2011
    I also remember that we were so poor that Dad would tear the Daily Express into neat squares and hang them on a nail in the outside loo.
    This was before the days of those little square green boxes of IZAL toilet paper.
    I always thought that the Daily Express was a lot softer.

  • Re: Newspaper by Peter Woodier (Member 10148049) on 18-May-2011
    Hi John. Izal is also known as "John Wayne" toilet paper. It's rough, tough and takes no **** from anyone.

  • Re: Newspaper by John HOLMES (Member 10245597) on 18-May-2011
    Brilliant mate, from now on my grandchildren are going to be taught to take some John Wayne from the toilet roll - thanks for a good laugh buddy.

  • Re: Newspaper by julie (Member 10255407) on 18-May-2011
    lol

  • Re: Newspaper by Michael Massey (Member 10258650) on 19-May-2011
    Hi!Lived at 23 Forbes Street until I got married in 1965.Re newspapers,apart of course from those tied together with string hanging on the "lav" white washed wall, as I young child I remember a man coming round the streets on a bike on Saturday nights shouting and selling EMPIRE NEWS!!Oh yes,a lit taper was required when visiting the loo.

  • Re: Newspaper by Mr. Roy Cox (Member 10242747) on 29-May-2011
    My Dad always bought the Evening Cronicle, and the Evening `Pink` on Saturday evenings for the football results. The Manchester Evening News was a broadsheet then, and a good paper it was too. I can remember there were usually at least two full pages of cinemas and what was showing!!
    Probably fit this on a piece of notepaper now !. Remember the Daily Herald anyone?.

  • Re: Newspaper by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 30-May-2011
    I remember The Chronicle well, we had it deliverd each night from Chesters News agent on the corner of Henry street. do you remember Mr Chester? he looked a bit like Alf Garnet, I well rememeber the Black band across the paper above the headlines, as they broke the news of the Busby babes plane crash, and i have been a united fan ever since

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Dr Garretts by Mary Clarke (Twin of Magaret) (Member 10227220) on 1-May-2011
Dr Garretts Conway North Wales, you either loved it or hated it, I loved it there but perhaps because i was one of the oldest there at the ripe old age of 14 years, some of the young ones were bullied or too home sick to enjoy it. I would love to hear from anyone that was there in 1947   
  • Re: Dr Garretts by John Brian Hughes (Member 10271461) on 27-May-2014
    My Dad worked at Dr Garretts in the 50's.

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